UNESCO field offices: Rabat

At a time when Algerian universities are training thousands of students in Information and Communication Sciences, the media sector has flourished in terms of job opportunities. However, print-media companies, both private and public, have been reluctant in opening their doors to university graduates. Graduates from universities' Information Sciences departments are rarely hired by the many French-language newspapers, which are increasing turning to graduates with diplomas in natural sciences and foreign languages. It is for this reason that the Ecole nationale supérieure de journalisme et...

The Ecole Nationale d’Administration was established in 1966 to train senior-level Mauritanian government officials, and in this capacity it was entrusted with the task of setting up Journalism Institute. Since 2011, the Institute has been offering a programme of initial training in journalism, as well as a programme of ongoing training aimed at practising journalists. Since then, it has been operating under the name, Ecole nationale d’administration, du journalisme et de la magistrature (ENAJM) (National School of Administration, Journalism and Magistracy). This project provides for a...

Since the birth of the social movement on 20 February 2011, which took to the streets of Morocco to demand policy reforms leading towards a genuine democratic regime respectful of human rights, numerous protesters have been attacked by law enforcement officials. Likewise, a large number of media professionals, both Moroccan and foreign, have suffered and continue to suffer from the violent reactions of a regime which has never ceased to practise a policy of control on information. These reactions range from physical aggression to the withdrawal of journalists' press cards, as well as...

The post-revolution media sector in Tunisia has entered an uncertain stage where there is a clear lack of regulation and confusion about media-ethics standards. The majority of media professionals does not differ between criticism and defamation, and some media managers incite their employees to go beyond ethical limits in order to increase their audiences and profits. Therefore, there is a general incorrect use of the right of freedom of expression and information by Tunisian media at large. Unfortunately, there isn’t any Press Council to ensure self-regulation among media professionals....

La presse écrite indépendante en Algérie est née en 1990, dans des conditions difficiles. Plus de 100 journalistes ont été assassinés au début des années ‘90 et d’autres ont été emprisonnés. Aujourd’hui, il existe plus de 80 quotidiens dans les deux langues, arabe et français. Plusieurs quotidiens réalisent des tirages très importants, dépassant les 100 000 exemplaires/jour. 90% des journalistes travaillant dans ces médias ont moins de 45 ans et ne bénéficient pas de cycles de formation continue ou de perfectionnement.

Bien que l’on puisse considérer la presse algérienne comme...

Au Maroc, la réforme de l’audiovisuel engagée en 2004, n’a pas débouché sur le pluralisme médiatique escompté : le paysage audiovisuel demeure à ce jour restreint aux médias du pôle public et aux médias privés à caractère commercial. La suppression du monopôle de l'Etat en matière de radiodiffusion et la création de la Haute Autorité de la Communication Audiovisuelle (HACA), n’ont pas abouti à un cadre juridique garantissant la liberté d’expression et le pluralisme et la loi en vigueur ne prévoit pas l’attribution de licence pour opérer des médias audiovisuels à caractère associatif ou...

Malgré l’existence d’un environnement médiatique plutôt favorable depuis les élections en 2009 qui ont marqué le retour de la Mauritanie à un ordre constitutionnel, l’absence de structure locale de formation de journalistes, l’accès difficile et le nombre réduit de formations à l’étranger ont constitué jusqu’ici des obstacles à une formation adaptée aux besoins des professionnels des médias. L’Ecole Nationale d’Administration, créée en 1966 pour former les hauts fonctionnaires de l’Etat mauritanien, s’est ainsi vu confier la mission de créer un institut de journalisme. Depuis fin mars 2010...

Article 14 of Algeria's Information Act (no. 90-07 of April 3, 1990) provides for the freedom of all periodical publications. The abolition of the State's monopoly on print media brought in its wake a proliferation of publications. Several publications, however, are subject to the influence of political and business interests, which subverts their editorial independence. Furthermore, the State monopoly in the audio-visual sector continues to remain in force, after timid signs of opening up in 1990 and later in 1997. Although the absence of pluralism at the national level is compensated for...

For a long time, the Mauritanian audio-visual sector was dominated by the two state-run media outlets - Radio Mauritanie and Télévision de Mauritanie, but with the July 2010 adoption by the National Assembly of a draft bill on the liberalisation of the audio-visual sector, the media landscape has begun to change. However, despite a rather favourable environment, the Mauritanian media is unable to take full advantage of the available opportunities due to a lack of specialist and quality training for media professionals. Mauritania's first journalism school is still in the design phase, and...

The crucial role played by the media in strengthening the democratic process and pluralism in Tunisia since January 14, 2011, is increasingly recognised by Tunisian society in general, and by the country's political and civil-society authorities in particular. The current situation calls for journalists who are highly competent and versatile. The need has become all the more pressing with the emergence of more than 112 new publications, and temporarily, 12 new radios (including 8 regional radios) on the media landscape. Not to mention the television channels and electronic journals which...

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