UNESCO field offices: Beijing

Along with more and more attention paid to the development of media and culture in China, the landscape for the dissemination of information and the promotion of freedom of expression has been changed by technological innovation, legal protection and political encouragement. Although China’s media environment has grown explosively over the past few years, the legal framework under which the media operates remains underdeveloped. It is therefore essential to pay more attention on the development of Chinese legal framework for media and freedom of expression.
 
The Price Media...

Mongolia is a country with a wide diversity of media outlets (more than 400) with the domination of private commercially-run media. The term community media is not widely accepted by the society and it is often associated with public service media. Community media as internationally accepted is not recognized by law in Mongolia, and no spectrum is reserved for the community broadcasters. 
 
Therefore, in Mongolia community radio is still at pioneering stage. Precursors to community radio were some local radios registered last decade with NGOs (such as Visually Impaired People’s...

China is a country with numerous ethnic minorities. The Chinese government has paid attention to the development of the broadcasting and television industry in the minority areas. In 2011, the coverage rate of broadcasting and TV in these areas has reached 98%. Yunnan province has inhabitants altogether from 26 distinct minorities living in eight autonomous prefectures. Each prefecture has its own TV station. In the past, these TV stations have gradually developed from relaying the programs produced non-locally by CCTV and by the main provincial TV station of Yunnan, to producing content...

In Mongolia, a long overdue Law on Gender Equality was passed in February 2011. The law is explicitly prohibiting any act of exclusion, restriction and discrimination against women in every sphere. The legislation obliges central and local governments, political parties, private employers including media organizations to install regulations and mechanisms to ensure gender equality and to fight sexual harassment, and introduce penalties to those who break them. The government has also set up a task force to draft a new Gender Equality Action Plan for the next 5 years.

In spite of ...

In China, media and gender issues have come to the fore since the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in 1995. More reports and programmes on women are now produced, helping to diversify the image of women portrayed in the media. However in spite of these improvements, media representation of women still lags behind China’s development in general. Women remain stereotyped and marginalized in the media. Even in media specifically orientated at women, the representation aspect remains a problem. The Chinese Women’s NGOs Report on Beijing+15 pointed out that “there lacks gender...

When Mongolia became a free-market democracy in the 1990s the number of media outlets drastically increased and thus so did the need for qualified journalists and media professionals. In the past ten years the number of media outlets, including newspapers, television, radio and magazines, has doubled, and the number of media employees has increased threefold. Mongolian tertiary training institutions have tried to meet this demand for qualified journalists. Currently there are 18 state and private higher educational institutions which offer journalism courses. However, the media managers...

Due to its vast size and economic situation, Mongolia's population suffers from high rates of unemployment, slow expansion of job opportunities, and limited access to healthcare and educational opportunities. These challenges are exacerbated among the 15% of the population belonging to ethnic minorities, due to their remote situation, language barriers and lack of access to information. Over 25 broadcasters currently operate in Mongolia, which can be accessed via increasingly popular satellite receivers. At present however, none of these operators provides a service catering to the...

As the free flow of information and ideas is at the heart of democracy and the cornerstone in human rights, the up-dating of the publication of Freedom of Information: A Comparative Legal Survey in 2008, and its translation into Chinese in 2009 are of great symbolic importance. The dialogue on freedom of information between China and the rest of the world is just beginning and the Chongqing University of China calls on UNESCO to seize an opportunity to capitalize on this unique occasion. This project intends to use the launch of the Chinese translation of the Freedom of Information...

There are more than 800 journalism schools in China, but there has never been a standardized set of curricula for journalism education. Lacking of a standardized guideline forced journalism schools to design their own courses, and also brought about a severe problem that every journalism school is creating their own curricula with their own focus. In such an environment of journalism education, the Chinese schools of journalism and communication are mass producing journalism students who are unqualified for the demand of the media industry. The aim of this project is to design a curriculum...

Subscribe to Beijing