Regions: Latin America and the Caribbean

In terms of journalism training programs, very few universities offer a degree in the specialty. Journalism courses are usually part of a Social Communication degree. Mid-career training is not part of the culture. Media companies are reluctant to pay, and the journalists are too poorly paid to afford it themselves. This project will train citizen journalists and professional journalists to access, organize and publish information on land use, water resources and development issues. It will also train them at established media outlets how to mobilize their audiences to help them in these...

In El Salvador, after the civil war and the Peace Accords (1992), there has been a new era for democracy and the implementation of new media outlets. However, some of these media projects, over time, have disappeared and others still face critical financial challenges for sustainability. Today, there are about 200 radio stations in the AM and FM bands -20 of these stations are self-defined as community radio, 4 major daily newspapers, about 16 television stations in VHF and UHF, and at least 3 online weekly newspapers. Nevertheless, there are some concerns about the level of media...

As part of the effort to foster and promote dialogue among Haitians, the MINUSTAH (United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti) and UNESCO in Haiti have made a network of 9 Multimedia Centres (MMCs) available to civil-society organisations and local authorities. Established in the communities as venues for learning and exchange, the MMCs enable beneficiaries to share information and knowledge as they work together on resolving priority concerns in their regions. Haitian journalists are regular users of the MMCs, where they enjoy free internet access, and technical (raising awareness of...

In Costa Rica, medias are well developed, but they do not always coincide with the democratic spirit of the country. It counts with almost 110 radio stations that broadcast their programmes, but they are still generally concentrated in the central part of the country, although the community radios make the exception. There is a large variety of weekly reviews and publications, but their news coverage remains limited, and sometimes with very low quality. The new media tools, based on the Internet, begin to get certain relevance, although it is still below the level reached by more developed...

Like its American counterparts, many Mexican and Central American newspapers will likely fall in hard times due to reduced circulation and advertising, these developments themselves caused by the challenges that the Internet and new technologies pose for the newspaper industry. Amid all these challenges, quality investigative reporting, which is very expensive to produce, will likely be neglected. Though time- and resource-consuming as it is, sound investigative journalism is much needed in the region's corruptionplagued, fragile democracies. These developments occur against a backdrop of...

Given ALER's capacity and impact in Latin America, through its daily work sustained by its networks?concretely the Continental Information Network?it is absolutely necessary to the develop skills in its media practitioners to enable them to utilize ICTs to strengthen their journalistic work. So, ALER is seeking the ownership and management of ICTs, new ways of interacting with our audiences (having traditionally linked to them through our broadcasting practice), empowerment of citizens to exercise their rights and the use of technology as an instrument to mobilize traditionally...

This project contributes to encouraging the involvement of young people in the area of communication, as a strategy to construct citizenship, increasing the capability for producing qualitative broadcasting and to allowing UNI RADIO to participate in the exchange of learning skills with other social actors to generate knowledge that should be socially useful and valid. It aims to provide training to sixty young people, belonging to four different communicational projects in the entire country. They will then be in a position to produce and edit their radio messages digitally, after...

According to a Guyana Press Association Survey report produced in 2004 as well as several student surveys, journalism in Guyana is viewed as an unprofessional profit driven enterprise. Efforts to change this perception and the current practices of the media are critical to democracy and development in the country. Hence, there is a need to strengthen the capacity of institutions teaching journalism in the country. Project Phoenix is a multi faceted project for the resuscitation and restructuring of the Centre for Communications Studies (CCS) at the University of Guyana. This critical...

Usually, introducing gender related policies and laws is not enough to succeed in fighting against women discrimination. Behaviors, values, judgments, roles, stereotypes, prejudices and so on, must be changed. Media has the responsibility of influencing positively in this process. Therefore, it is necessary to provide media professionals with the knowledge and skills necessary to recognize and to address gender issues in all communication process and to be gender-sensitive while producing news and reporting objectively. The Jose Marti International Institute of Journalism has a group of...

New needs have been identified in Bolivia, namely: The indigenous Chiquitano organisations currently possess two FM transmitters, and a third on the way, all inspired by the Bolivian vision of community radio. However, the long-term viability of the equipment is jeopardised by the lack of human-resources trained in the production of multi-format radio material ; The indigenous organisations do not have a web site promoting their culture and the work they accomplish in their communities ; Media workers need to be provided with appropriate tools for training and facilitating information...

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