Regions: Latin America and the Caribbean

In Costa Rica, medias are well developed, but they do not always coincide with the democratic spirit of the country. It counts with almost 110 radio stations that broadcast their programmes, but they are still generally concentrated in the central part of the country, although the community radios make the exception. There is a large variety of weekly reviews and publications, but their news coverage remains limited, and sometimes with very low quality. The new media tools, based on the Internet, begin to get certain relevance, although it is still below the level reached by more developed...

Like its American counterparts, many Mexican and Central American newspapers will likely fall in hard times due to reduced circulation and advertising, these developments themselves caused by the challenges that the Internet and new technologies pose for the newspaper industry. Amid all these challenges, quality investigative reporting, which is very expensive to produce, will likely be neglected. Though time- and resource-consuming as it is, sound investigative journalism is much needed in the region's corruptionplagued, fragile democracies. These developments occur against a backdrop of...

Given ALER's capacity and impact in Latin America, through its daily work sustained by its networks?concretely the Continental Information Network?it is absolutely necessary to the develop skills in its media practitioners to enable them to utilize ICTs to strengthen their journalistic work. So, ALER is seeking the ownership and management of ICTs, new ways of interacting with our audiences (having traditionally linked to them through our broadcasting practice), empowerment of citizens to exercise their rights and the use of technology as an instrument to mobilize traditionally...

According to a Guyana Press Association Survey report produced in 2004 as well as several student surveys, journalism in Guyana is viewed as an unprofessional profit driven enterprise. Efforts to change this perception and the current practices of the media are critical to democracy and development in the country. Hence, there is a need to strengthen the capacity of institutions teaching journalism in the country. Project Phoenix is a multi faceted project for the resuscitation and restructuring of the Centre for Communications Studies (CCS) at the University of Guyana. This critical...

The communities in the south are isolated and indigenous ? Mopan and Q'eqchi' Maya. Unfortunately, radio cannot reach many of these villages due to the terrain. This is particularly problematic because these villages also are home to poor, marginalized indigenous people who need access to information and communications technologies. It is imperative that local Maya receive accurate and up-to-date information. Given its accessibility and cost-effectiveness, community radio represents a democratic and participatory medium. People can be united by community radio. Tumul K'in Learning Center...

This project contributes to encouraging the involvement of young people in the area of communication, as a strategy to construct citizenship, increasing the capability for producing qualitative broadcasting and to allowing UNI RADIO to participate in the exchange of learning skills with other social actors to generate knowledge that should be socially useful and valid. It aims to provide training to sixty young people, belonging to four different communicational projects in the entire country. They will then be in a position to produce and edit their radio messages digitally, after...

In the provinces of Peru, radio station owners ?frequency permit holders-- rent time space indiscriminately. This practice constitutes a critical problem as far as journalistic practices are concerned, and is criticized by journalists and citizens alike because it is the vehicle used by journalists and pseudo journalists to slander and undertake smear campaigns, defame o blackmail authorities and citizens in exchange for money. It is this recurrent anomaly, related to journalism and ethics, which demands attention and change, in order to gain leeway in the work towards promoting an...

Media houses in the region basically focus on the bottom line, profit maximisation. Development issues such as climate change generally do not receive the amount of air coverage they deserve. This is partially due to the high cost of air time but more importantly the high cost of producing televisions programmes in the region. Additionally there is scarcity of journalists trained to report on environmental issues, particularly climate change. Most television content on the environment broadcast in the Caribbean is extra-regional in origin. The material tends to be educational, informative...

Ecuador has more than 1000 FM or AM radios. Only 10 of them carry programs in Kichwa. Regarding the written media, there are 45 daily newspapers all in Spanish, with two of them in the Imbabura Province: El Norte and La Verdad. There are no daily nor weekly newspapers in Kichwa language in Ecuador. In this context, the Kichwa Indian population finds it difficult to make its voice heard. The commercial newspapers monopolize virtually all advertising, depriving community publications of the necessary support and restraining media plurality, thereby questioning the development and use of...

A forthcoming study to be published by INSI Latin America Office shows that two thirds of the journalists murdered in a decade were journalists investigating political corruption or economic crimes (so called parallel powers) and 74% of them were working for radio or written Media1. These journalists, potentially most affected by violence, usually do not have the means to access timely information on security or acquire the necessary skills and hence are most at threat. This project proposes to develop a way of delivering in a timely and economic mean security information and skills to...

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