Regions: Latin America and the Caribbean

Media and broadcasting institutions in Bolivia (at least 15 with national reach) are concentrated in two conglomerates : private corporations and state-owned media. Though community media has increased in number, it hasn’t yet developed the capacity to create independent content. This means that although there appears to be a wide diversity of media, the content production is reduced to a small group of journalists. This scenario restricts the exercise of freedom of the press and threatens the public’s right to access quality information. This situation is aggravated by the fact that...

Colombia is a country that has had almost 60 years of internal armed conflict, as a result of inequalities, exclusion of broad strata of the population and weakness of the State. The country has been controlled by powerful groups (such as private corporations, national elites, wealthy families, etc.), which has resulted in widespread violence with many expressions and multiple stakeholders. This has negatively affected the economy and the country’s development, causing high rates of poverty and inequality. The nation spends heavily on security and defense, to the detriment of funding for...

Peru has about nine million indigenous citizens, who speak 43 different languages. However, there are high rates of extreme poverty among the indigenous population and they suffer constant violations of their fundamental rights. In this context, timely access to information is a means for these peoples’ progress and integrated development. Indigenous communication makes sense when practiced within the framework, world-view, language and culture of each native community, so the indigenous peoples themselves must produce, manage and disseminate information on their peoples in the media –...

The media panorama in Venezuela, as in the rest of Latin America, is facing major new challenges. The media reality in the Andean Region and in Latin America is in general similar. Most radio and television frequencies and the main newspapers are owned by a very few private companies. At the same time, Venezuela faces the challenge of taking responsibility for making the new information technologies (ICTs) available to all and to conveying knowledge properly to the most vulnerable, isolated population groups.

As community media arise, the problem that crops up is to train their...

In 2011 Guatemala descended 20 positions in the world classification of press freedom as developed by Reporters without Borders. In the period (2008-2011) a total of 8 journalists were reported assassinated, of whom none have had their case solved, with the number of violations against freedom of expression increasing to 179 cases of aggression.

Several reports point towards the fact, that many subjects such as organized crime, corruption, impunity and human rights violations are subjects that are not covered and present in the media. Journalists in Guatemala face violent attacks,...

A total of 24 journalists have been killed in Honduras in the past decade, 17 of them since the coup d’état. Murders of citizens who provided information to the media or defended human rights and media pluralism also go unpunished. In Honduras, women journalists and journalists who work to defend women’s human rights are particularly vulnerable and at risk. Women journalists receive vicious threats and direct attacks, as well as endure harder censorship because of wide-spread bias that women are more prone to cave in to intimidation.

In 2011, with the support of the United Nations...

Indigenous communities in Mexico have long since been excluded and relegated to poverty and marginalization, urgently requiring access to media platforms in order to freely express their voices and to participate in public decision making. Radio Huayacocotla La Voz de los Campesinos (Radio Huaya) has been able to contribute to the exercise of these rights, despite the adversities. Nahuatl, Tepehua and Otomi indigenous people and the Spanish-speaking peasants are the main actors who participate in the Radio. In rural and indigenous communities in Mexico there are a few women working in...

Organized crime and corruption are the principal sources of direct violence that have brought about the killing of more than a hundred journalists in the past decade, mainly in Mexico and Honduras, the forced exile of hundreds of journalists; and the shutdown of dozens of media outlets. News media self-censorship has become institutionalized as "common practice." Recklessness and negligence in news coverage is due to the lack of training in basic investigative techniques, inadequate compensation for journalists by their employers; and absence of solidarity and camaraderie among journalists...

In the Dominican Republic freedom of expression, press freedom and other related media issues are protected by different laws. There are many traditional and new media outlets for such a small country (and a Small Island Development State) but ownership of media is highly concentrated within a few privileged politic and economic powerful groups. This limits the diversity of media content and confines the views and topics covered by media to private interests. In 2010, the former Dominican President, Leonel Fernández, formed a national commission that prepared 5 law projects to reform or...

The Curaçao media landscape can best be described as rich. It is rich in the sense that there is an overwhelming amount of media for such a small island. Two daily newspapers La Prensa and Amigoe are most popular. There is a government run television station TeleCuraçao which provides information and entertainment. Three radio stations Radio Hoyer, Easy FM and Dolfijn FM serves the island country with its coverage. Social media and citizens’ media are quite active and vibrant in the country and provide much needed boost in democratic participation of the citizens. However, there is an...

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