Regions: Asia and the Pacific

Nepal's media sector has made great advances in the past two decades, with the introduction of laws ensuring press freedom paving the way for private and community involvement in the media. Today, more than 11 television channels broadcast from Kathmandu, and over 237 radio stations operate within the country, including a substantial number of community radio stations. Community radio has the proven potential to enable marginalized communities to exercise their right to knowledge and information, including them in policy and decision-making processes, and promoting the diversity of their...

Great progress has been made in recent years in developing the Maldivian media, with 2007 witnessing the issuing of licenses for the first private broadcasting stations as well as the formulation of six media-related bills, one of which has been adopted. Much work is still required however, particularly in providing training for the country's media professionals, and in further developing the legal framework with special regard to freedom of expression. This was reiterated by last year's media development assessment in the Maldives (carried out using UNESCO's Media Development Indicators...

According to estimates from media experts, around 40% of the Kyrgyz population living in rural areas does not have access to information. Given that around 65% of the country's entire population lives in rural areas, this represents a worrying statistic. Rural communities are therefore deprived of their right to participate in national and local debates, and to access knowledge on the practices, policies and technologies that help promote sustainable development. This project from community radio station 'Radiomost' will attempt to motivate community members to actively contribute to the...

Journalists and media outlets in Kazakhstan are frequently subjected to law suits from both individuals and organizations with libel and defamation charges, often resulting in the closure of media outlets due to bankruptcy, as well as the threat of imprisonment for journalists. The stimulus for such law suits is often media articles or reports based on unverified or unreliable information, resulting from a fundamental lack of legal knowledge on the part of journalists and media managers. At present, very little time is devoted to covering the subjects of libel and defamation within...

The challenges related to climate change demand that mass media institutions be proactively involved in public awareness activities. As a consequence, high priority is given to comprehensive training programmes for young journalists of Uzbekistan. The state programme of training media workers of the Republic of Uzbekistan indicates the need to teach journalists how to address new challenges. There is a growing number of both state and non-state print media, TV and radio studios and growing competition in the media sphere. An analysis of the work of domestic media and of the level of...

New challenges are emerging in Sri Lanka on the form and direction of the post conflict transformation. Vibrant and professional media practice is vital in many aspects throughout the post conflict transformation stage to bring voices of the ground to decision making level as well as to inform the public on what is happening around them in order to make individual decisions. Sri Lankan media has been generally divided along the ethnic and linguistic lines over the period of the ongoing conflict, thus creating an environment for escalation of the misunderstanding between communities in the...

In Tajikistan, radio is the only broadcast medium that can be received in all areas of the country. Few journalists have academic or professional training in the field, and (with some notable exceptions), the quality of information-gathering, reporting and writing is low. Media rights organizations report that, although provided for in the constitution, press freedom is not widely respected. However, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) ranked Tajikistan in its 2008 Press Freedom Index as having the highest level of media freedom among the five Central Asian states. Opportunities for...

Media development in Kazakhstan's regions has been slow. Although new private media outlets have opened, journalists lack basic educational and professional skills; with low salaries, they are susceptible to pressure from local political and business interests. Many do not know their legal rights?for example, for access to information?and lack training in research, fact-checking and providing balanced stories. Financially-struggling media outlets regularly publish or broadcast hidden advertising, press releases from local government or businesses masquerading as news stories. Regional...

Many Cambodian newspapers and private radio and TV stations depend on support from political parties. Although press freedom is not guaranteed, the government has declared support for press freedom, publicly praising the benefits to society of an unfettered media. There are no restrictions on satellite dish ownership and foreign radio broadcasts can be received easily from neighboring countries. The purpose of the project is to develop reporting skills in the provincial media in the Kingdom of Cambodia, which has been neglected by the tertiary education sector and other training...

A three tiered media structure comprising public, private and community is now in place. However, there are critical issues of concern. First, the guidelines subsume campus radio, community radio and agricultural universities under the same umbrella. This is unrealistic, particularly in the context of management and ownership. Community radio stations in most parts of the world are managed and owned by communities, in contrast to campus and agricultural university radio stations. Other issues of concern are that the guidelines do not permit community radio stations to broadcast news. This...

Pages

Subscribe to Asia and the Pacific