Regions: Asia and the Pacific

There is an enormous demand in the media sector for skilled media professionals. It is estimated that there are approximately 10,000 journalists working in Nepal, most of whom have not received any form of training. Following this project, NPI will have increased its the capacity to provide training to newspaper and radio journalists who live outside of Kathmandu and who do not have access to other media training opportunities. A major problem in Nepal is that the workforce in the media is largely unskilled. Untrained journalists are easily influenced and manipulated by political and other...

Radio provides a platform for discussion and processing information for the population. With print media unable to reach the illiterate majority and with television still powerless to break through to the majority of the population it has been left to Radio to emerge as the prominent media serving the people from the cities right down to the communities of Afghanistan. Reach remains the sector's largest problem, but sets are within the reach of even many poor families and run off batteries, and there is a long tradition of listening to radio in Afghanistan. Despite efforts undertaken by...

The Press clubs located in the Federally Administrated Tribal Areas (FATA) are under-resourced and underdeveloped. There are seven independent press clubs in the FATA, with the membership of 250+ journalists working with the print and electronic media. In their current form, the press clubs primarily provide a 'journalistic identity' through membership to their members and a platform for the exchange of information. They do not provide a means of broad professional development. Nor is there any formal mechanism for the members of the clubs from different areas to share experiences with...

As the free flow of information and ideas is at the heart of democracy and the cornerstone in human rights, the up-dating of the publication of Freedom of Information: A Comparative Legal Survey in 2008, and its translation into Chinese in 2009 are of great symbolic importance. The dialogue on freedom of information between China and the rest of the world is just beginning and the Chongqing University of China calls on UNESCO to seize an opportunity to capitalize on this unique occasion. This project intends to use the launch of the Chinese translation of the Freedom of Information...

In terms of broadcasting, all stations in Sarawak are either under the Information Ministry or commercial broadcasters, leaving no room for community media. Strong laws such as the Printing Presses and Publications Act and the Official Secrets Act prevent the media from being independent and plural. Communities that lack resources or political connections cannot have their own newspaper or radio station. As a result, there are no community media in any format that exist to support indigenous communities and individuals. Newspapers in Sarawak seldom report on controversies concerning...

Although rapid changes in new technologies continue to transform the media industries, they cannot replace human creativity and competency. Trained trainers are in dire need. There are much fewer women trainers in the media than men, due to the fact that fewer opportunities are given to them to acquire the specific skills required to become trainers. Hence this project is aimed specifically at potential women media trainers. Women wishing to become media trainers must acquire knowledge in designing relevant curricula and adopt up-to-date teaching techniques within the context of a fast-...

The mass media in Papua New Guinea (PNG) are mainly servicing the urban minority group, while the bulk of the population, which makes up 85% that lives in the rural sector, is largely ignored of any product of the media. Many media graduates opt for employment in towns and major industries where the conditions are better. There is a felt need to bridge this gap so that information reaches the rural areas. The existing media organisations in PNG have many limitations on their news coverage and are often challenged by lack of adequate resources, political interference, monopoly of ownership...

Janaagraha sees the opportunities offered by radio to enhance its performance in governance through economically viable means. Community radio stations are expected to produce at least 50% of their programmes locally, to the extent possible in the local language or dialect. While the focus is on developmental programming, there is no explicit ban on entertainment. Centralized one-way broadcasting at various levels of aggregation has limited scope to serve the goals of development, especially in a society characterised by pluralism and diversity, as is the case in India. While private radio...

The main reason for transforming Kabul weekly into a national newspaper is the lack of reporting from the countryside. Currently, only private and government TV and radio stations broadcast reports on issues in the provinces; moreover, the scope of these reports is limited. A second reason for creating a nationwide newspaper is of a socio-political order: the ongoing conflicts between the different ethnic groups in the country. Tadjiks, Uzbeks, Pashtuns and Hazaras play a major role in political, economic and social issues. A country-wide newspaper can only gain the trust of all the...

No local television station, including OTV, provides daily or weekly newscasts. Other than TV, there are no opportunities available for television journalists. Nearly every household, in even the most remote areas of Palau, has a television and receives OTV through the National Cable system. OTV is Palau's only television station that operates with public/private cooperation and provides both commercial programming and public access. OTV is the most watched channel in the nation and has absolutely no political affiliation. Capacity building of community news media will allow OTV to train...

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