Regions: Asia and the Pacific

The challenges related to climate change demand that mass media institutions be proactively involved in public awareness activities. As a consequence, high priority is given to comprehensive training programmes for young journalists of Uzbekistan. The state programme of training media workers of the Republic of Uzbekistan indicates the need to teach journalists how to address new challenges. There is a growing number of both state and non-state print media, TV and radio studios and growing competition in the media sphere. An analysis of the work of domestic media and of the level of...

In Tajikistan, radio is the only broadcast medium that can be received in all areas of the country. Few journalists have academic or professional training in the field, and (with some notable exceptions), the quality of information-gathering, reporting and writing is low. Media rights organizations report that, although provided for in the constitution, press freedom is not widely respected. However, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) ranked Tajikistan in its 2008 Press Freedom Index as having the highest level of media freedom among the five Central Asian states. Opportunities for...

Central Asian countries have been broadcasting via independent systems since 1992, but governmental censorship of press freedom, weak media legislation and corruption present barriers for the development of non-partisan media. Practical training and programme production can help broadcasters in the region to fully engage with the access to information initiative by highlighting the public's rights in countries where freedom of information has been ratified. Involvement of state and private broadcasters on the topic of access to information could help increase populations' level of...

Media development in Kazakhstan's regions has been slow. Although new private media outlets have opened, journalists lack basic educational and professional skills; with low salaries, they are susceptible to pressure from local political and business interests. Many do not know their legal rights?for example, for access to information?and lack training in research, fact-checking and providing balanced stories. Financially-struggling media outlets regularly publish or broadcast hidden advertising, press releases from local government or businesses masquerading as news stories. Regional...

Pacific media practitioners collect, shape and deliver information to some of the most scattered and isolated nations and small island communities on the planet. Many Pacific media practitioners lack the understanding of freedom of the media and its links to good governance, of the need to protect it and build broader public ownership and support of it, and of the skills to defend it when it comes under attack. Recent developments in the region have sparked concern over the status of free media in the Pacific. The current military regime in Fiji has helped to create unprecedented levels of...

No local television station, including OTV, provides daily or weekly newscasts. Other than TV, there are no opportunities available for television journalists. Nearly every household, in even the most remote areas of Palau, has a television and receives OTV through the National Cable system. OTV is Palau's only television station that operates with public/private cooperation and provides both commercial programming and public access. OTV is the most watched channel in the nation and has absolutely no political affiliation. Capacity building of community news media will allow OTV to train...

The governments, and other prime movers of the development effort, recognise that communication is the most essential factor for successful development. It is, therefore, imperative that adequate resources of funding, expertise and planning be invested for integration of the Information and Communication Technologies( ICTs) in the broadcast media so as to exploit the immense opportunities offered by information and communication technologies in reaching audiences hither-to disconnected with the mainstream media or so far unreachable. While the technology is the driving force behind the...

Though there are a large number of newspapers, weeklies, television channels and radio stations, access to media is still a privilege enjoyed by upper and middle class people. The indigenous communities in the country's northern part and those living in Chittagong hill tracts are the most marginalized and disadvantageous groups of people. They are hardly represented in the mainstream media. Consequently their issues and concerns remain largely unexpressed. Under this project, skills and capacity of the unprivileged indigenous communities on radio journalism and production will be increased...

This project will provide training to fifty media workers working in various media outlets in Central Asia. It will equip them with essential skills and knowledge by participating in five 3-day training courses and will enable them to: (i) support their own information security and that of their organizations based on personal responsibility; (ii) reduce the risk error and plagiarism, and irrelevant use of equipment, as well as introducing a mechanism for tracking such errors; (iii) prevent unsanctioned access in the operation of the organizations' information systems; (iv) assure secure...

Under this project, the skills and capacity of CR personnel will be increased through a training program, a newsletter and a web portal. The project aims to enable CR personnel to produce and broadcast CR programs, and successfully manage and run CR stations for the rural and marginalized communities. One-hundred and eighty organizations have applied for a CR license. To facilitate the registration and operation process, BNNRC has opened a help desk and set up a Community Radio Academy (CRA). It has been observed that skilled manpower is lacking to run the CR stations. While setting up CR...

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