Regions: Asia and the Pacific

Though there are a large number of newspapers, weeklies, television channels and radio stations, access to media is still a privilege enjoyed by upper and middle class people. The condition and position of women is still quite vulnerable in mass media industry. Women are placed in low-ranking administrative jobs with no responsibility or with no possibilities of career development. Their participation in media is still very limited and is far from having reached a critical mass when women can make a difference. The project aims to increase women's participation in upcoming CR and to change...

Bangladesh experiences an urban bias with regard to distribution of economic and social goods, and media is no exception. Only 16 percent of the rural population has access to newspapers, and local newspapers are published in urban areas and therefore do not focus on rural problems. However, the main part of the rural population in Bangladesh is facing some of the largest development problems so far due to climate changes. It is essential to involve these peoples in the country's process towards a more democratic and developed society. Furthermore, although Article 39 of Bangladesh...

The proposal is framed by concerns about the severe repressions against the media and freedom of expression in Fiji, and fears across the region about the potential for a domino effect on other Pacific Island States. This project will therefore seek to address problems which weaken free media and pluralistic media development, while enhancing the professional capacity of media workers and their organisations, though provision of training identified as a key need for the region. By building on the experience of the IFJ, notably in South Asia, to create national and regional networks through...

Central Asian countries have been broadcasting via independent systems since 1992, but governmental censorship of press freedom, weak media legislation and corruption present barriers for the development of non-partisan media. Practical training and programme production can help broadcasters in the region to fully engage with the access to information initiative by highlighting the public's rights in countries where freedom of information has been ratified. Involvement of state and private broadcasters on the topic of access to information could help increase populations' level of...

There are hundreds of CLCs around Nepal, but only a handful of operative and self-sufficient CMCs. A proper network among these centres, starting from fewer districts, could become a fundamental awareness and information channel for communities. Although the quality and diversity of media are increasing in more populated areas, this is not true in remote areas. There, the often illiterate population has to receive information largely from local radio, and not enough quality information is available. CMCs practitioners have not received professional training, some are not well informed...

There is an enormous demand in the media sector for skilled media professionals. It is estimated that there are approximately 10,000 journalists working in Nepal, most of whom have not received any form of training. Following this project, NPI will have increased its the capacity to provide training to newspaper and radio journalists who live outside of Kathmandu and who do not have access to other media training opportunities. A major problem in Nepal is that the workforce in the media is largely unskilled. Untrained journalists are easily influenced and manipulated by political and other...

Radio provides a platform for discussion and processing information for the population. With print media unable to reach the illiterate majority and with television still powerless to break through to the majority of the population it has been left to Radio to emerge as the prominent media serving the people from the cities right down to the communities of Afghanistan. Reach remains the sector's largest problem, but sets are within the reach of even many poor families and run off batteries, and there is a long tradition of listening to radio in Afghanistan. Despite efforts undertaken by...

The Press clubs located in the Federally Administrated Tribal Areas (FATA) are under-resourced and underdeveloped. There are seven independent press clubs in the FATA, with the membership of 250+ journalists working with the print and electronic media. In their current form, the press clubs primarily provide a 'journalistic identity' through membership to their members and a platform for the exchange of information. They do not provide a means of broad professional development. Nor is there any formal mechanism for the members of the clubs from different areas to share experiences with...

As the free flow of information and ideas is at the heart of democracy and the cornerstone in human rights, the up-dating of the publication of Freedom of Information: A Comparative Legal Survey in 2008, and its translation into Chinese in 2009 are of great symbolic importance. The dialogue on freedom of information between China and the rest of the world is just beginning and the Chongqing University of China calls on UNESCO to seize an opportunity to capitalize on this unique occasion. This project intends to use the launch of the Chinese translation of the Freedom of Information...

In Lao PDR, mass media has been gradually evolving. An increasing variety of types of media are being used, including newspapers, radio and television. There are both private- and government- owned media. Freedom of expression is guaranteed by the recently endorsed media law. In order to produce quality media, the skills of media professionals need to be developed. In 2004, a Mass Media Bachelor Course was initiated at the Department of Lao Language and Mass Media, Faculty of Letter, National University of Laos. Since its establishment, the Department has been playing a crucial role in...

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