Regions: Asia and the Pacific

When Mongolia became a free-market democracy in the 1990s the number of media outlets drastically increased and thus so did the need for qualified journalists and media professionals. In the past ten years the number of media outlets, including newspapers, television, radio and magazines, has doubled, and the number of media employees has increased threefold. Mongolian tertiary training institutions have tried to meet this demand for qualified journalists. Currently there are 18 state and private higher educational institutions which offer journalism courses. However, the media managers...

These include several regional, national and local channels with a constantly growing viewership. The print and electronic media in Pakistan has experienced a remarkable transformation in the last decade and now Pakistan enjoys a vibrant media scene with unprecedented diversity of opinion available in various ethnic languages. The electronic media can play an important role by highlighting local and national issues and performing a critical watchdog role. However, much of the new electronic media in Pakistan is relatively unsophisticated and most content revolves around entertainment....

In recent years there has been an increase in the number of lawsuits filed against media professionals on grounds such as defamation, contempt of court, breach of parliamentary privilege, sedition, and breach of public morals and media ethics. This has exposed an urgent need for journalists to acquire an understanding of the legal environment in which they operate in order to protect themselves against such dangers. The Asia-Pacific Institute for Broadcasting Development (AIBD) is committed to addressing the issue of legal awareness among journalists in order to maintain plurality of...

The Paris Declaration on Broadcast Media and Climate Change adopted by UNESCO in 2009, recognizes that broadcast media play a critical role in stimulating policy debate and in mobilizing knowledge to empower societies' decision-making on issues relating to climate change. In order to maximize this role, it is essential that journalists are provided with the means and knowledge to disseminate accurate information on such matters in a manner which is accessible at a local level. This project aims to address this need by equipping print journalists with the necessary scientific knowledge and...

In 2008, the Oceania Television Network (OTV) developed the Micronesian island of Palau's first ever television news programme, with the help of financial support from the IPDC. Since its launch, television news has become the primary source of information for the Palauan community - raising awareness and promoting discussion on important political, educational, environmental and social issues. With the exception of Palau however, much of Micronesia does not have access to television news, due to lack of resources in terms of equipment, staff, and training opportunities. This project will...

The Asia Pacific Broadcasting Union's Children Item-Exchange Meeting was founded in 1992 to provide an annual occasion for producers of children's television in the Asia-Pacific region to meet, exchange ideas and learn from each other. These capacity-building meetings have made a substantial contribution to improving the quality of children's programmes produced by ABU members. In order to continue this strive to improve the standard of children's TV in Asia, this project aims to facilitate exchange opportunities among producers in the Asia-Pacific region to enhance the use of the...

Access to information is of paramount importance in enabling economic, political and social development of Central Asian countries in their fight against corruption. In recent years, developments have been made in this area, with the passing of laws on Access to Information in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan occurring in 2006 and 2008 respectively, and discussions for a law on Access to Public Information in Kazakhstan being initiated in 2010. In spite of this progress however, Central Asian mass media continue to encounter problems in accessing information, with the 'Adil Soz' Foundation...

The liberalization of the broadcasting and print media sector in Pakistan over the past two decades has led to an explosion in the number of circulating newspapers and magazines, with over 850 publications in circulation today. Historically this growth began in the main metropolitan centres, however the devolution of power to local governments across Pakistan has led to increased pressure on the media sector to mirror this change and provide support to district correspondents. At present this support is largely unavailable, with district correspondents often poorly educated, underpaid, and...

Access to accurate and reliable information is a necessity for the people of Pakistan in their struggle for democracy. At present, more than 40% of the Pakistani population lives in poverty, with over than two-thirds of this figure living in rural areas. Some 65% of people living in rural areas are illiterate and lack access to news and information. This project aims to address this worrying statistic by using radio as a means of reaching out and providing a voice to rural communities. A target group of 150 journalists, selected from 25 FM radio stations from smaller towns and rural areas...

Due to its vast size and economic situation, Mongolia's population suffers from high rates of unemployment, slow expansion of job opportunities, and limited access to healthcare and educational opportunities. These challenges are exacerbated among the 15% of the population belonging to ethnic minorities, due to their remote situation, language barriers and lack of access to information. Over 25 broadcasters currently operate in Mongolia, which can be accessed via increasingly popular satellite receivers. At present however, none of these operators provides a service catering to the...

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