IPDC Project source of funds: IPDC Special account

Nicaragua’s indigenous communities have little access to the media, meaning they do not have a platform from which to voice concerns on the besiegement and usurpation of their lands and hence to define their future. Furthermore, the national media fails to convey their aspirations to live on their territories in accordance with their customs, stereotyping them as delinquents and/or land thieves. Local access to a means of communication is therefore vital for the indigenous communities of Nicaragua. This project will facilitate the creation of indigenous media outlets by providing training...

Since the developing island nation of Palau gained independence, media development has been slow. It has just four radio stations, two newspapers and one state-owned television station. Access is restricted to those in the main population area and, for television, to those who can pay. Furthermore, television programming is subject to government restrictions, with stringent rules governing election coverage.
 
This project will install and train personnel to operate Palau’s first free-to-air television station. With 90% of the population living within the proposed broadcast...

While Mozambique as a whole has a fairly developed media sector, the Manda Wilderness area faces limitations to media coverage. Journalism as a profession does not exist in the area. There are no daily newspapers; no Mozambican Internet or mobile network coverage (only expensive Malawi services); and no media tools to share relevant information (e.g. on health, education and agriculture). As a result, the Manda Wilderness communities have no voice on issues of concern to them.
 
Training community individuals to cover issues and spread freedom of speech would therefore be a...

Violence against media workers and impunity of the perpetrators of such crimes are widespread in Mexico and Central America and have resulted in many deaths. These crimes require adequate safety measures, particularly for journalists working in remote areas who are most at risk. This project will build and launch a sustainable online training system for journalists, available anytime and anywhere within Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador and Mexico.

Media repression is rising in some countries in the Pacific, as journalists seeks ways to work together to promote quality journalism and democratic media development. This project will work with journalists and media workers in three countries in the region in order to advance reform and produce examples of best practice to positively influence the rest of the region. Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands have been chosen because of the existing or emerging strength of their national media associations and/or their potential for maximum project impact.
 
The...

Zambia’s growing community media sector, which boasts 60 radio stations and 6 print entities, is regarded as an important tool for community and grassroots development. These media outlets are responsive to their audiences and have established themselves as frontline sources of information and platforms of communication for the communities in their coverage areas.
 
However, community media journalists are increasingly subject to incidents of intimidation and harassment and there have also been arrests and domestic censorship of some online newspapers. Most of these journalists...

The proposed project will address the lack of science media associations and limited professional capacity of science media workers in the Balkan region. BASJ, a newly created regional journalists association, will promote online education and cooperation with other international and regional organizations and institutions in the Balkans. It will offer a 6-month online training course delivered through webinars and online lectures using BASJ's Science Media Network platform. The course will upgrade the skills of 20 journalism trainers, enabling them to teach new media competencies. The...

Myanmar was once described as the site of “one of Asia’s—if not the world’s—longest ethnic-based conflict since the country’s independence in 1948”. There are 135 distinct ethnic groups throughout the country, and recent studies have cited media as a “driver of conflict” due to inaccurate reporting, misinformation, bias and preference for conflict stories.
 
News media could play a key role in informing and educating different ethnic groups about their commonalities and differences, leading to greater understanding and tolerance. Dialogue between media practitioners, bloggers...

One of the major resolutions of Zimbabwe’s 2012 Media Stakeholders Conference was the need for the media to play a central role in promoting awareness about, and responses to, climate change. A lack of journalists trained to understand climate and environmental issues has resulted in minimal reporting on climate change and a lack of sufficient information to promote public efforts of mitigation and adaptation.
 
This project will address the need to educate Zimbabwean journalists on climate change by training a group to report on weather, agro-economics and tourism news as well...

Iraq ranks as the fourth most corrupt state in the world. Officials routinely steal resources, thereby robbing Iraqis of opportunities to improve the lives of their families and communities. Investigative journalism exposes corruption, enhances transparency and makes officials accountable to the people, all of which leads to the improved performance of government institutions. However, the majority of Baghdad’s media organisations lack the capacity to professionally investigate the actions of government. This project will therefore train 40 local (female) journalists from regional media...

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