IPDC Project source of funds: IPDC Special account

This project aims to address some of the objectives of the UN draft Plan of Action arising from the UN Inter-Agency meeting on the Safety of Journalists and the Issue of Impunity, particularly the dissemination of a best practices guide on the safety of journalists as well as the training of journalists. By working with expert contacts in the safety field and drawing on its own experience, the International News Safety Institute (INSI) aims to reach at least 2,000 journalists and media workers, in addition to governments and military across the world, with this comprehensive reference...

The Government of Bangladesh adopted the Right to Information (RTI) Act in 2009 and makes provisions for ensuring free flow of information and people’s right to information. The freedom of thought, conscience and speech are also recognized in the Constitution as a fundamental right, with the right to information being a distinguishable part of it. Technological advancement in recent years has led to a boom in broadcast media: 20 private TV channels and 8 Radio stations have been established in the past couple of years while traditional forms of journalism remain strong.
 
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Burundi is one of the smallest countries on the African continent, with a land mass of 27,830 km², only slightly larger than neighboring Rwanda with which it has much in common. Like twins, these two countries share the pain of a bloody decade marked by genocide and "hate media". In 1960, Burundi had only one National Radio, one daily newspaper (Le Renouveau) and only one private newspaper, “Ndongozi", of the Catholic church, published in Kirundi. The advent of multipartism in 1990 introduced different private radios, TV and newspapers. Burundi currently has 15 radio stations, 5 TV...

Media in Bhutan has undergone considerable growth after the establishment of democracy in 2008. Today, mass communication in Bhutan encompasses both traditional and New Media technologies, ranging from newspapers, radio and TV to mobile phones and the internet. According to a UNESCO-supported Media Development Assessment (MDA) conducted in Bhutan in 2010, there are vital elements missing in the media landscape which need to be addressed. These include policy and legal frameworks to support the growth of media; Right to Information laws to ensure transparency and good governance; Fiscal and...

Radio is acknowledged as the most widespread electronic communication medium in the world and the most convenient and affordable means of reaching the world’s populace, particularly in very remote areas. Recent surveys on Audience-Scape (2010) carried out by InterMedia show that radio is an indispensible tool in Kenya for delivering development information. Nearly all Kenyans are radio listeners, and nearly all of these listeners said they use this medium as a regular source of news and information: 89 percent of Kenyan adults get news and information from the radio on at least a weekly...

The merits of Public Service Broadcasting institutions are widely and vigorously debated but guidance and knowledge is needed for broadcasters on how they should respond to creating Public Service Broadcasting for public interest with the convergence of new technologies. In this era it is important that broadcasters understand how PSB can be defined and redefined to perform its functions effectively. In May 2012 broadcasters from across South-Asia will gather in Bangkok, Thailand, for the Asian Media Summit. This provides an excellent opportunity to partner with AIBD, the host organization...

There are more than ten thousand low-power radios in Brazil, most of them community radios. The applicable law on community radios, 9.612/98, imposes many limitations on their activities, including preventing community radio stations from broadcasting advertisements or belonging to a network, thus constraining their potential. Community radio stations throughout Brazil exist despite the lack of training policies or subsidies for improved development of communication activities, leading to problems in sustainability and a tendency to copy commercial models of communication.
 
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The 1994 genocide in Rwanda provides a telling case study of the role the media can play in a conflict situation. The genocide was among the most appalling catastrophes of the 20th century and media, especially the radio, played a significant part both nationally and internationally. Prior to the genocide, radio stations and newspapers in Rwanda were carefully used by the conspirators to dehumanize the potential victims, particularly Rwanda's Tutsi minority, rather than address the plight and development of what was viewed as the minority in the society. Currently the majority of radio...

Latin America and the Caribbean is a very vulnerable region where the environment is concerned. The Dominican Republic is a Small Island Developing State (SIDS) where the impact of climatic change has the potential to be devastating for the environment. Unfortunately media workers and journalists often do not have specialist degrees, and they particularly lack knowledge and training on issues related to the environment. As a consequence, they are unable to reflect objectively such issues, and assume their role of surveying the negative impacts on the environment and educating citizens to...

Since the end of 1994 genocide in which “hate” media played a major role both before and during the events, and following the liberalization of the airwaves in the late 2000s, Rwanda’s media landscape has seen tremendous change in terms of the number of media houses and the quality of the programmes. From overreliance on a single state owned media and a few government-controlled print media, the nation today boasts over 20 FM stations and one public TV channel, as well as over 40 newspapers, thanks to new laws on press issues, in particular law N°22/2009 of 12/08/2009 on Media. The...

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