IPDC Project source of funds: IPDC Special account

The 1994 genocide in Rwanda provides a telling case study of the role the media can play in a conflict situation. The genocide was among the most appalling catastrophes of the 20th century and media, especially the radio, played a significant part both nationally and internationally. Prior to the genocide, radio stations and newspapers in Rwanda were carefully used by the conspirators to dehumanize the potential victims, particularly Rwanda's Tutsi minority, rather than address the plight and development of what was viewed as the minority in the society. Currently the majority of radio...

There are more than ten thousand low-power radios in Brazil, most of them community radios. The applicable law on community radios, 9.612/98, imposes many limitations on their activities, including preventing community radio stations from broadcasting advertisements or belonging to a network, thus constraining their potential. Community radio stations throughout Brazil exist despite the lack of training policies or subsidies for improved development of communication activities, leading to problems in sustainability and a tendency to copy commercial models of communication.
 
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Since the end of 1994 genocide in which “hate” media played a major role both before and during the events, and following the liberalization of the airwaves in the late 2000s, Rwanda’s media landscape has seen tremendous change in terms of the number of media houses and the quality of the programmes. From overreliance on a single state owned media and a few government-controlled print media, the nation today boasts over 20 FM stations and one public TV channel, as well as over 40 newspapers, thanks to new laws on press issues, in particular law N°22/2009 of 12/08/2009 on Media. The...

Latin America and the Caribbean is a very vulnerable region where the environment is concerned. The Dominican Republic is a Small Island Developing State (SIDS) where the impact of climatic change has the potential to be devastating for the environment. Unfortunately media workers and journalists often do not have specialist degrees, and they particularly lack knowledge and training on issues related to the environment. As a consequence, they are unable to reflect objectively such issues, and assume their role of surveying the negative impacts on the environment and educating citizens to...

The media in Somalia has grown despite the chaos that ensued after the fall of the military government of General Siad Bare. In Mogadishu alone, there are over 10 independent radio stations, more than 20 privately-owned newspapers and more than 30 Somali websites on the internet, but all of these media outlets are directed by men who also occupy positions of authority. Women neither sit at the decision-making organs of these media institutions nor work as managing directors, editors and owners. Women journalists do not receive the same opportunities as their male counterparts in terms of...

The means of creating and maintaining effective, culturally appropriate radio learning programmes on-air requires consistent support. This project presents opportunities for long term partnership solutions to this problem, expanding networks of collaboration and enhancing the long-term development of community media in the Caribbean. Its purpose is to train social development workers to create community radio content as another platform for participatory communication with vulnerable groups. Participants will include healthcare workers, social workers, teachers and police officers who will...

There are some 48 publications in circulation in Uganda, according to the official Media Council website, and 8 TV stations regularly on air with many more registered. Most of these stations are urban-based. The Uganda Broadcasting Corporation (radio and TV), government owned and controlled, struggles to operate as a public broadcaster, covering only 3/4 of the country. Community radio is weak and faces serious financial and human resource challenges. There are also barely any operational community newspapers or television stations.
 
While the growth in the broadcast sector...

The purpose of this project is to establish and make operational a sustainable Radio Station and Community Multimedia Centre at the Youth Training Centre to service the Trinidad and Tobago Prison Community in recognition that they are a special needs, high risk community of over 4000 members, and therefore to increase the diversity of media and impact positively on Press Freedom. The Trinidad Youth Council is also motivated by the empirical findings of Ito and DiClemente, showing the benefits of engaging Youth in learning processes that involve the use of Digital Media and its implication...

The media landscape in Uganda (including new media) is characterized by diversity, independence and sustainability. The number of licensed Radio stations as at July 2010 is 244. Out of these, only eight are community based radio stations. In reference to the African Media Barometer Uganda report 2010, the editorial independence of print media is protected adequately against undue political interference. A number of universities offer degree courses in journalism. One, Makerere, has a Master’s programme. In 2002, the Eastern Africa Media Institute – Uganda Chapter developed a National...

The Caribbean region is exposed to a wide range of natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes, earthquakes and volcanoes. It has been described as the second most hazard-prone region in the world. Various factors render Caribbean populations extremely vulnerable to disasters. These factors include socioeconomic issues such as high population density and high levels of poverty.
 
The Commonwealth Broadcasting Association (CBA) is the largest global association of public service broadcasters and the Caribbean Broadcasting Union is the regional broadcasters’ union. The provision...

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