IPDC Project source of funds: IPDC Special account

The aim of the project is to strengthen the professional capacity of the community-radio journalists and broadcast presenters involved in collecting, processing and disseminating radio information; it seeks to strengthen the institutional framework of community radio stations by providing a solid basis for their independence, and thereby contributing towards the promotion of freedom of expression, the pluralism of ideas, and the diversity and quality of information provided to local communities. 

The safety of journalists is a serious problem in the Dominican Republic. This project therefore aims to train Dominican journalists to understand the legal framework in which they perform their duties, identify threats they may confront, learn risk reduction skills and develop safety initiatives, in accordance with the UN Plan of Action on the Safety of Journalists. The training program will follow UNESCO’s Model Curricula for Journalism Education - A Compendium of New Syllabi (2013). Specifically, it will adapt the Safety and Journalism course, including the section on specific threats...

Since gaining independence in the 1990s, Tanzania’s media sector has grown rapidly and it is now one of the most developed in the region. However, women are largely absent as media owners. Private media houses, which comprise the bulk of media houses in Tanzania, are owned almost exclusively by men. The proposed project therefore seeks to help Tanzania reach its commitment to gender equality in and through media. The UNESCO Gender Sensitive Indicators for Media would be used to assess the level of gender mainstreaming in 14 community radios in Tanzania. The findings would then be used to...

None of Belize’s junior colleges or universities provide formal journalism training, despite a growing demand for journalists. Consequently, most of the country's journalists enter the profession with an education in a different field and may not possess the skills and competencies required to be competent journalists. The Organization for the Promotion of Youths in Journalism (OPYJ) is concerned about this situation and has been working with interest youths to help them secure scholarships to study journalism abroad. However, due to limited resources, it has only been able to secure such...

Journalists in Malawi face considerable risks to their safety as they conduct their professional duties. Restrictive media laws are in place and some journalists are not aware of the full implication of these laws, which exposes them to even greater danger. For example, during the protests on 20 July 2011 about issues of human rights and poor governance, police ordered a crackdown on journalists attempting to cover the event and reportedly beat, arrested and harassed some of them. The state broadcasting regulator also directed three independent radio stations to stop coverage of the...

Portsmouth, one of the most populous communities in Dominica, has limited access to media since there are no community-owned outlets serving that region and only limited low-cost options available. This project will therefore provide the necessary equipment and training to establish a community-owned radio outlet. The station is projected to reach over 6,000 listeners across the town of Portsmouth and its environs. It will empower citizens by enabling immediate and affordable access to information on relevant issues as well as the promotion of culture. 
 

While Mozambique as a whole has a fairly developed media sector, the Manda Wilderness area faces limitations to media coverage. Journalism as a profession does not exist in the area. There are no daily newspapers; no Mozambican Internet or mobile network coverage (only expensive Malawi services); and no media tools to share relevant information (e.g. on health, education and agriculture). As a result, the Manda Wilderness communities have no voice on issues of concern to them.
 
Training community individuals to cover issues and spread freedom of speech would therefore be a...

While there is a large and varied media market in the Caribbean region, most outlets are regulated by the state and are subject to defamation laws. Regional, national and international media workers’ associations have been advocating the relaxation of the libel laws across the region in order to facilitate more robust scrutiny of public officials. This relaxation process requires individual media markets and a code of practice so that a public complaints body can be established. This project will establish/strengthen media self-regulatory systems in the Caribbean region by developing a...

Zambia’s growing community media sector, which boasts 60 radio stations and 6 print entities, is regarded as an important tool for community and grassroots development. These media outlets are responsive to their audiences and have established themselves as frontline sources of information and platforms of communication for the communities in their coverage areas.
 
However, community media journalists are increasingly subject to incidents of intimidation and harassment and there have also been arrests and domestic censorship of some online newspapers. Most of these journalists...

In 2006, the Forum for Argentine Journalism (FOPEA), a nationwide grouping of independent journalists, adopted the country’s first comprehensive ethics code. This is an important step given that journalists in Argentina face constant challenges to the delivery of balanced news reports. However, many FOPEA members have had difficulty understanding how to apply the code. FOPEA therefore proposes to produce a user’s guide and ethics advisory council, both of which will help journalists and media companies address ethical dilemmas. The code will encourage self-regulation, while the advisory...

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