IPDC project priority: Promoting Freedom of Expression and Media Pluralism

The Gabonese media landscape comprises a multiplicity of media organs and publications. Where the media is concerned, the National Communications Council is the main regulatory body. On the other hand, the process of self-regulation has yet to be firmly established. A self-regulatory body - the Gabonese Media Observatory - has existed since 2004, but its work has been limited due to a lack of self-regulation instruments which meet with the general approval of media professionals.
 
In 1995, following the liberalisation of the media landscape, a group of Gabonese journalists...

Since the end of 1994 genocide in which “hate” media played a major role both before and during the events, and following the liberalization of the airwaves in the late 2000s, Rwanda’s media landscape has seen tremendous change in terms of the number of media houses and the quality of the programmes. From overreliance on a single state owned media and a few government-controlled print media, the nation today boasts over 20 FM stations and one public TV channel, as well as over 40 newspapers, thanks to new laws on press issues, in particular law N°22/2009 of 12/08/2009 on Media. The...

There are some 48 publications in circulation in Uganda, according to the official Media Council website, and 8 TV stations regularly on air with many more registered. Most of these stations are urban-based. The Uganda Broadcasting Corporation (radio and TV), government owned and controlled, struggles to operate as a public broadcaster, covering only 3/4 of the country. Community radio is weak and faces serious financial and human resource challenges. There are also barely any operational community newspapers or television stations.
 
While the growth in the broadcast sector...

This project is aimed at Capacity Building within leading broadcasting organizations in the Asia-Pacific region, focusing particularly on correcting serious gender imbalances and inequities in employment opportunities, female participation and media portrayal of women and girls in the region. The project is in line with The Beijing Platform for Action for Equality, Development and Peace, which places specific obligations on the media, both, in the way women participate and in how they are portrayed. Its overall aim is the achievement of the Beijing Declaration objectives, that require...

Southeast Asia is represented by a diverse range of countries in terms of politics, economy and culture, and a clear divergence in terms of respect and appreciation for fundamental human rights. The aforementioned diversity is also reflected in the media situation of the individual countries of the region, as found by respected international press freedom monitors. The 2010 press freedom index by Reporters Without Borders placed most of the countries in the region at the bottom quarter of the 178 countries assessed, while Freedom House concluded in its Freedom of the Press 2011 survey that...

In the 2011 Assessment of Media Development in Timor-Leste which is based on the UNESCO Media Development Indicators (MDI), media self-regulation is one of the prominent elements lacking in the current Timor-Leste media landscape. A healthy voluntary self-regulatory system within the media landscape is one of the cornerstones of freedom of expression, press freedom, and democratic governance. It is also the best means of guaranteeing high ethical and professional standards in journalism. Currently, there is no outlet to handle media complaints or to provide redress against unprofessional...

In the early 1980s and during the civil war, Lebanon saw rapid development of its radio, television and print media in both the public and private sector. Since this time however, no effort has been made to establish a national code of ethics to serve as a guideline for journalistic work. Media institutions in the country today are largely owned by or affiliated with political parties, and the absence of a code of ethics means that journalists are not protected and do not have freedom of expression. In the past decade, two initiatives of codes of ethics have been proposed by private...

Belarusian internet provides a platform for relative freedom of expression when compared to other media outlets within the country which are characterized by a state monopoly. This, combined with the soaring numbers of internet users (almost 30% of the population in 2010 thanks to the development of faster and better quality online technologies), makes internet television a prime opportunity for increasing the plurality of media in Belarus. At present, no Belarusian website has engaged users to create video content or share videos online. This project from the BelaPAN Information Company...

Media in Egypt occupy a highly influential position within the Arab world, and on a superficial level Egyptian journalists enjoy the right to exercise press freedom, as guaranteed within its Constitution. The reality under the governance of Hosni Mubarak however, saw the press regularly subject to restrictive laws which violated international press freedom standards. In Tunisia too, both the print press and broadcasting media were under tight government control, with President Ben Ali's authorities controlling access to news sources and ensuring online censorship. The recent popular...

Despite rapid growth in the development of the Armenian media which recently has come in the form of increased internet accessibility, there is still a worrying lack of access to information for more than half of the Armenian population today, with the latest national survey on internet accessibility conducted by the World Bank in 2008 revealing that only 5.8% of Armenians use the internet. Citizen journalism has been identified as a possible means of attracting interest in new technologies and existing civil society resources, as well as promoting youth activism in the region. The...

Pages

Subscribe to Promoting Freedom of Expression and Media Pluralism