IPDC project priority: Promoting Freedom of Expression and Media Pluralism

Drug trafficking has become one of the main causes of problems relating to security, violence, corruption and weakening of democracy in the countries of Latin America. Fear of reporting on the topic continues to spread among journalists however, with increasingly fewer reporters venturing to cover drug trafficking and organized crime issues because they fear for their lives.
 
This project therefore is aimed at providing journalists who cover drug trafficking and organized crime, working along Colombia’s border zones, with training on self-protection mechanisms, complemented by...

Application of the UNESCO Media Development Indicators (MDI) in Ecuador has revealed that media self-regulation mechanisms, such as using codes of ethics or editorial guidelines, are not fully practiced. The study also showed that only one print medium has a Public Ombudsman to receive readers’ complaints, and in the entire country there are no Press Councils or Commissions for complaints that might ensure good journalism practices in day-to-day work. In turn, citizens’ perception of the media is not positive: 51.74% consider the media corrupt. Media self-regulation must therefore be...

As a society it is essential to recognize and contribute towards the respect of indigenous peoples’ human rights. The universal values of freedom, equality, solidarity, tolerance, respect for nature, respect for others, and respect for cultures and languages, are essential in the safeguarding of respectful relations between human beings, communities and societies, and in order to address this issue it is important to first look at the sociocultural diversity of a country.
 
This project will focus on alternative methods of communication, to enable participants to develop...

The media environment in Egypt was characterised by severe repression under the former ruling president, Hosni Mubarak. In terms of press freedom for example, Egypt was ranked 130th out of 196 countries globally by Freedom House in their Freedom of the Press 2010 Report. Despite the fall of the regime following the January 25th uprising, a lack of freedom of expression remains in force today. Traditional media as well as citizen journalism have played an important role in setting the stage for change in the country. In the upcoming period, and in the context of the transition towards...

This project aims to address some of the objectives of the UN draft Plan of Action arising from the UN Inter-Agency meeting on the Safety of Journalists and the Issue of Impunity, particularly the dissemination of a best practices guide on the safety of journalists as well as the training of journalists. By working with expert contacts in the safety field and drawing on its own experience, the International News Safety Institute (INSI) aims to reach at least 2,000 journalists and media workers, in addition to governments and military across the world, with this comprehensive reference...

In Tunisia, both the print press and broadcasting were tightly controlled by public authorities. The mainstream press toed the party line and authorities regularly blocked access to alternate news sources. In the wake of the January 2011 popular revolt, many journalists have been able to enjoy new-found freedoms. The new government will now be faced with the difficult task of ensuring a smooth democratic transition, involving: 1) Creating a favourable environment for the media to fulfil their democratic potential will be essential in this process. 2) Putting in place new media laws. These...

Although major advances have been made in increasing media diversity and pluralism in Eastern Africa, some countries in the region continue to be subject to repressive media laws and policies curtailing media freedom. Such laws and policies create a restrictive environment for media practitioners, and impinge media development in the long term. Therefore a progressive campaign for just and democratic media laws is necessary if Eastern Africa is to make a successful transition to democracy. This project will assist in developing a network of media practitioners campaigning for media law...

In 2008, events relating to the arrest of journalists and police raids on the premises of a local private radio station caused Mauritius to drop 21 places on the Global Media Freedom Index by Reporters without Borders. In the same year, the African Media Barometer reiterated this negative trend by underlining that the state-controlled operator 'MBC', which dominates Mauritian television, is highly political and propagandist in terms of content and influence. Further shortcomings also exist within the profit-driven private media sector, particularly in terms of its portrayal of women. This...

The absence of a media complaints mechanism in Swaziland has led to a lack of trust of the media sector by the majority of citizens. In an effort to address the issue, the Cabinet of the Kingdom of Swaziland has endorsed the creation of a Media Commission Bill which would seek to regulate the media. However, this has been met with opposition by many media stakeholders who feel strongly that the media sector should be self-regulated and not subject to government control, particularly since the country's media landscape is at present dominated by state-owned channels. Media organizations...

Despite large numbers of women occupying positions in the Colombian media today, the gender divide is ever-present with female media professionals regularly subject to discrimination. At fault is a lack of interest concerning gender issues combined with a lack of organized training. For these reasons, the Colombian Federation of Journalists created FECOLPER Women's Network, an internet network created specifically for the exchange of information about gender and freedom of the press. This project aims to strengthen the institutional capacity of FECOLPER by applying UNESCO's Guidelines on...

Pages

Subscribe to Promoting Freedom of Expression and Media Pluralism