IPDC project priority: Promoting Freedom of Expression and Media Pluralism

Liberia experienced a civil war which spanned fourteen years. Peace was brokered in 2003 and in 2005 an elected Government was installed. Since then a proliferation of print and electronic media institutions have developed in the capital Monrovia and other parts of the Country. Currently, there are more than thirty FM radio stations in Monrovia and about forty community radio stations strewn all over Liberia. There are five television stations and over twenty-five newspapers. The national broadcaster, Liberia Broadcasting System, which transmitted radio and television programs nationally...

In 52 years of post-independence Nigeria, the military establishment has ruled for 29 years while civilians have ruled for 23 years out of which only last 13 years were uninterrupted by military coup detat. The long rule of the military has affected the psyche of Nigerian rulers, even the civilians, who see closure of media houses, threat of withdrawal of broadcast licences, arrest of journalists and general impunity against the press as instrument of governance.

The above chronicle of events gives credence to the fact that the safety of journalists in Nigeria is not safeguarded...

Journalists and media practitioners in Southern Africa face relatively similar regulatory and legislative challenges, exposing them to a wide range of risks in their line of duty. Among the regulatory and legislative challenges are repressive media laws, restrictive policies, and arbitrary arrests of journalists and denial of access to information, among others. For example, while in Zimbabwe journalists are subjected to a rigorous registration process and are denied access to information considered privy to the state through the Access to Information Protection of Privacy Act (AIPPA),...

Although the Djiboutian government includes in its constitution under Article 15 clear guarantees to freedom of expression and media freedom and has also ratified a number of relevant regional and international human rights instruments, it maintains a number of laws that are incoherent to these acceptable international human rights standards which severely restrict media freedom.

The Djiboutian human rights record was reviewed under the aegis of Human Rights Council’s first cycle of Universal Periodic Review on 2 February 2009. While the state delegation highlighted some of the...

Despite the lack of federal government in Somalia for the past 20 years, there is a vibrant media landscape throughout the country. Security and lack of infrastructure has made it nearly impossible to gauge the exact number of broadcasters, radio stations, newspapers and websites that operate within Somalia and beyond its borders to diaspora populations, but estimates put numbers of media outlets in Mogadishu at 12 radio stations, 15 newspapers, several television stations and many individually-owned online news blogs. In spite of the encouraging figures, however, many media outlets are...

In South Sudan the impact of long years of conflict and war are still very evident in almost all aspects of society, and enormous efforts are currently underway to ensure peace and security, reconstruction and development. However, development processes will be difficult without the establishment of a free media in order to create an atmosphere of peaceful co-existence and to institutionalize a culture of democracy in the country. There has been limited investment in the development of the media sector in the country, and recent assessments show how the lack of access to objective...

The media in Uganda has grown over the last three decades mainly because of liberalization of the sector which permitted individual ownership. This pattern implies an increase in the number of electronic and print media houses that widely recruited personnel to run these entities. Currently there are over 240 licensed radio stations in Uganda, although this figure is higher if the other 40 unlicensed are taken into account. Televisions currently operating number over twenty and newspapers stand at thirty. The context appears pluralistic given the statistics but this does not mean there are...

Right of access to information is considered as one of the most essential Constituents of freedom of press and media. As per the studies and annual reports issued by the Press Syndicate and the Civil Society Institutions, right of access to information is inaccessible to journalists and media professionals in Jordan. The Jordanian Constitution does not provide citizens the right of access to information, in addition to the fact that the law which guarantees the right of access to information is a restricted law which leads to making the confidentiality of information and documents is the...

The conclusion many researchers have drawn is that (for the most part) the media relegate women to marginality, silence or absence. It has been revealed to several field studies and media conferences that there are certain obvious obstacles to women's access to various communication and information sources, particularly in Upper Egypt. These include poverty, illiteracy, low levels of education and lack of time. National and local conferences about mass-media confirmed that journalists in Upper Egypt, and especially women, are in dire need for consistent systems of scientific knowledge...

During the first six months of 2012, the Palestinian Center for Development and Media Freedoms (MADA) monitored 102 violations against journalists and media outlets, of which 34 were physical attacks. In addition, over the past decade, IOF have killed 20 journalists during while they were covering various events in Palestine. Media departments at the Palestinian universities are contributing to the current situation in two ways: curricula do not include courses about local media laws or international conventions, legal standards and resolutions related to journalism. Therefore, journalists...

Pages

Subscribe to Promoting Freedom of Expression and Media Pluralism