IPDC project priority: Human Resource Development

Malgré des élections en janvier 2011 reconnues par la communauté internationale comme transparente et démocratique, la RCA affiche aujourd’hui le visage d’un pays politiquement instable, économiquement faible et dans lequel le niveau d’insécurité dans l’arrière-pays reste une source de préoccupations. C’est dans cette ambiance de pauvreté et de misère accrue ainsi que d’insécurité qu’évolue la presse centrafricaine.

La RCA n’abritant jusqu’en 2009 aucune structure de formation initiale pour les professionnels des médias, ces derniers ont donc appris leur travail « sur le tas », ce...

La presse écrite indépendante en Algérie est née en 1990, dans des conditions difficiles. Plus de 100 journalistes ont été assassinés au début des années ‘90 et d’autres ont été emprisonnés. Aujourd’hui, il existe plus de 80 quotidiens dans les deux langues, arabe et français. Plusieurs quotidiens réalisent des tirages très importants, dépassant les 100 000 exemplaires/jour. 90% des journalistes travaillant dans ces médias ont moins de 45 ans et ne bénéficient pas de cycles de formation continue ou de perfectionnement.

Bien que l’on puisse considérer la presse algérienne comme...

Malgré l’existence d’un environnement médiatique plutôt favorable depuis les élections en 2009 qui ont marqué le retour de la Mauritanie à un ordre constitutionnel, l’absence de structure locale de formation de journalistes, l’accès difficile et le nombre réduit de formations à l’étranger ont constitué jusqu’ici des obstacles à une formation adaptée aux besoins des professionnels des médias. L’Ecole Nationale d’Administration, créée en 1966 pour former les hauts fonctionnaires de l’Etat mauritanien, s’est ainsi vu confier la mission de créer un institut de journalisme. Depuis fin mars 2010...

Madagascar has been suffering from an unresolved political crisis since 2009 which has resulted in declining economic and human rights indicators and a widening communications gap between the Malagasy population and its leaders. With no mechanisms to ask for information, or hold their leaders to account, the population remains marginalised and disenfranchised from the democratic process with negative impacts on local governance. In the rural south in particular, where almost three quarters of the population are not literate, poorly educated and isolated, radio is the only source of...

A research summary report of the African Media Development Initiative (AMDI)14, indicates that literacy rates for urban areas of Tanzania average 35.4% and that the country has some of the lowest rates of access to Television and Newspaper based media across sub-Saharan Africa, with only 34% watching TV and 31% reading a newspaper at least once a week. The AMDI report also highlights low levels of professional, ethical, management and technical standards among media practitioners, which is attributed to: insufficient or poor-quality training institutions; rapid expansion of media outlets (...

 Journalism training in Malawi has progressed in leaps and bounce since the country’s return to a multiparty system of government. Historically, the media training institutions have approached journalism training from a traditional perspective in keeping with the way journalism has been practiced in the country and the region. In terms of curriculum standards, each institution pursues its own. While this is generally a norm in most training institutions in the world, including Malawi, it is preferable to have certain bench marks for all institutions. But media in Malawi is responding to...

In Zimbabwe, journalists take professional risks in the process of collecting and disseminating news and information. The risks become higher when the country is experiencing conflict, journalists become a target. As one media analyst observed, conflict and post-conflict areas in Africa are very dangerous for journalists. Safety issues rank high and journalists have fallen into trouble because of the existence of restrictive media laws. In some instances, journalists have themselves been reckless by not fully familiarising themselves on the full implications of existing laws. The Zimbabwe...

Harare Polytechnic’s School of Journalism and Media Studies is the oldest journalism and media training institution in Zimbabwe. It trains print and broadcast journalists for the country’s public broadcaster as well as for the print media houses. The training which is a two-year full-time National Diploma is practically-based in line with market demands. Many graduates from the institution are readily absorbed by media houses in the region, and plans are at an advanced stage for Harare Polytechnic to introduce a Bachelor of Technology degree in Mass Communication.
 
In spite...

A lot of expansion and some progress has been realized in the media landscape, not only in Kenya but in the entire Eastern Africa region in recent years, including the rapid increase in media training institutions, both at the University and tertiary level. Reservations nonetheless continue to be expressed regarding the quality and depth of media content in broadcast and print production, based on the growing sophistication and high levels of expectations from a more educated and democratically aware citizenry.

Following discussions among East African Potential Centres of...

This project is focused on strengthening science journalism training at all tertiary levels, reaching both undergraduates and mid-career journalists on a post-graduate level. This will aim at training science journalists in South Africa every year and to provide training to students at postgraduate level to follow a course in science & technology journalism at Stellenbosch University. The initiative also builds on efforts by Tshwane University of Technology, Namibian Polytechnic and Makerere University to enhance science journalism reporting, within the framework of UNESCO’s work in...

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