IPDC project priority: Community radio

This project aims to adapt and implement a participatory model of CR programme production, the Community Learning Programme (CLP). In doing so, the project proponent, Rupantar, will build on its earlier work with the Commonwealth Educational Media Centre for Asia (CEMCA). CEMCA is the regional agency for the Commonwealth of Learning (COL), and implements COL’s mandate in eight South Asian countries.

This project proposes innovative documentation of good practice through the use of participatory content creation / participatory audio and video production methodologies. The project will support the use of innovative new media technologies like the mobile and the internet to enable community radio stations to create and share this body of work with each other and with the national and global community

CEPPAS proposes to train women journalists on the use of ICTs for investigative journalism. The project targets Verapaces, North East and Petén; Western; South East, Central and Metropolitan Regions which suffer a profound digital divide and where women have little say in the community media, in which they work. The proposal is based on three pillars: gender equality; community media; technology and innovation with emphasis on FOSS.

Three workshops of three days each will involve women-journalists. CEPPAS will also hold a Forum on Women and Journalism involving media and advocacy...

The Vuelan las Plumas platform seeks to become an example of quality cultural journalism whose content production can be taken advantage of by many other media and forms of communication. 
 
The creation of content requires a professional team with the capacities to develop quality programs and interviews. Vuelan las Plumas consists in generating and broadcasting live via radio and TV, and then uploading the content produced to the website to be downloaded by other communications media professionals and the wider public. To achieve this, capacity building is essential. ...

Niger has a free, pluralistic and independent media, which comprises, according to the High Council for Communication – the media regulatory body –, 2 state-owned newspapers (one daily and one weekly), 48 privately-owned newspapers, one of which is a daily, 1 state-owned radio station, 7 state-owned regional stations, 51 privately-owned radio stations with 37 relays, 133 community radio stations with 2 relays, and 18 authorised television stations with 23 relays, two of which are state-owned. To date, there are 133 community radio stations in Niger which hold a licence issued by the High...

As freedom of expression and the right to access to information among poor and marginalised populations are threatened by aggression directed against journalists, attacks against community radio stations and by conflict situations, the workshop will contribute to strengthening this freedom and this right. The project will also contribute to peace and general safety. On completion of a 4-day workshop, 20 community-radio journalists – including 4 from Côte d'Ivoire, 2 from the Central African Republic, 4 from Senegal and 10 from Mali –, from as many radio stations, will be trained as...

The aim of this project is to promote the gender approach in order to contribute to the creation of an environment that is conducive to freedom of expression among women and radio broadcasters for more widespread popularisation of the culture of equality. One hundred and five external presenters and producers from 70 RIF-member radios stations will be trained in the concepts of gender, climate change and food security. After the training sessions, 70 programmes on climate change and food security will be produced, with the concept of gender as the overarching theme. The programmes will be...

The aim of the project is to strengthen the professional capacity of the community-radio journalists and broadcast presenters involved in collecting, processing and disseminating radio information; it seeks to strengthen the institutional framework of community radio stations by providing a solid basis for their independence, and thereby contributing towards the promotion of freedom of expression, the pluralism of ideas, and the diversity and quality of information provided to local communities. 

While Mozambique as a whole has a fairly developed media sector, the Manda Wilderness area faces limitations to media coverage. Journalism as a profession does not exist in the area. There are no daily newspapers; no Mozambican Internet or mobile network coverage (only expensive Malawi services); and no media tools to share relevant information (e.g. on health, education and agriculture). As a result, the Manda Wilderness communities have no voice on issues of concern to them.
 
Training community individuals to cover issues and spread freedom of speech would therefore be a...

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