IPDC project priority: Community radio

This project aims to adapt and implement a participatory model of CR programme production, the Community Learning Programme (CLP). In doing so, the project proponent, Rupantar, will build on its earlier work with the Commonwealth Educational Media Centre for Asia (CEMCA). CEMCA is the regional agency for the Commonwealth of Learning (COL), and implements COL’s mandate in eight South Asian countries.

This project proposes innovative documentation of good practice through the use of participatory content creation / participatory audio and video production methodologies. The project will support the use of innovative new media technologies like the mobile and the internet to enable community radio stations to create and share this body of work with each other and with the national and global community

CEPPAS proposes to train women journalists on the use of ICTs for investigative journalism. The project targets Verapaces, North East and Petén; Western; South East, Central and Metropolitan Regions which suffer a profound digital divide and where women have little say in the community media, in which they work. The proposal is based on three pillars: gender equality; community media; technology and innovation with emphasis on FOSS.

Three workshops of three days each will involve women-journalists. CEPPAS will also hold a Forum on Women and Journalism involving media and advocacy...

The Vuelan las Plumas platform seeks to become an example of quality cultural journalism whose content production can be taken advantage of by many other media and forms of communication. 
 
The creation of content requires a professional team with the capacities to develop quality programs and interviews. Vuelan las Plumas consists in generating and broadcasting live via radio and TV, and then uploading the content produced to the website to be downloaded by other communications media professionals and the wider public. To achieve this, capacity building is essential. ...

While Mozambique as a whole has a fairly developed media sector, the Manda Wilderness area faces limitations to media coverage. Journalism as a profession does not exist in the area. There are no daily newspapers; no Mozambican Internet or mobile network coverage (only expensive Malawi services); and no media tools to share relevant information (e.g. on health, education and agriculture). As a result, the Manda Wilderness communities have no voice on issues of concern to them.
 
Training community individuals to cover issues and spread freedom of speech would therefore be a...

The Ethiopian media is a very recent phenomenon, mainly consisting of state-controlled radio and television. Addis Ababa City Administration Community Media (FM 96.3) is one of the few community radio stations in the country. It serves 1.5 million people across a 105 km radius, providing 18 hours of daily transmission in Amharic, the official language of Ethiopia. However, its journalists lack professional skills.
 
The proposed project aims to address this gap by training volunteer journalists, reporters, editors and technicians at FM 96.3 to be able to produce high quality...

There is a severe lack of information in the Rwandan media concerning the environment and the effects of climate change on agricultural production. Community radios have the potential to play a decisive role in filling this gap but lack the technical capacity to do so. If this skills shortage were addressed, educational radio programmes on the environment and climate change could reach more than 4,000,000 people from 15 radio stations, including rural communities, decision-makers and local leaders, enabling them to fully participate in environmental protection and take appropriate measures...

Community reporting has never been a priority in Lesotho. The media is based in the capital city of Maseru and rural voices are rarely heard. Rural communities only make the news in negative stories or when a government official comes to officiate a development initiative. Given the increase in social and political problems in rural Lesotho, it is becoming more and more critical for rural communities to have an alternative media platform where they can have their voices heard and can discuss their own issues and possible solutions.
 
Lesotho’s only community radio station,...

Khorixas, with an estimated population of 68,735 people, is one of the lest developed parts of Namibia. This town and the neighbouring villages receive no daily newspapers and only intermittent radio coverage from one state-owned station. Khorixas therefore lacks a community platform to discuss development and social issues in a pluralistic, accessible and democratic way and is isolated from regional, national and international affairs.
 
There have been recurring and unmitigated resource-based conflicts over the years between the region’s diverse communities. In addition, the...

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