IPDC project priority: Community radio

This project aims to adapt and implement a participatory model of CR programme production, the Community Learning Programme (CLP). In doing so, the project proponent, Rupantar, will build on its earlier work with the Commonwealth Educational Media Centre for Asia (CEMCA). CEMCA is the regional agency for the Commonwealth of Learning (COL), and implements COL’s mandate in eight South Asian countries.

This project proposes innovative documentation of good practice through the use of participatory content creation / participatory audio and video production methodologies. The project will support the use of innovative new media technologies like the mobile and the internet to enable community radio stations to create and share this body of work with each other and with the national and global community

CEPPAS proposes to train women journalists on the use of ICTs for investigative journalism. The project targets Verapaces, North East and Petén; Western; South East, Central and Metropolitan Regions which suffer a profound digital divide and where women have little say in the community media, in which they work. The proposal is based on three pillars: gender equality; community media; technology and innovation with emphasis on FOSS.

Three workshops of three days each will involve women-journalists. CEPPAS will also hold a Forum on Women and Journalism involving media and advocacy...

The Vuelan las Plumas platform seeks to become an example of quality cultural journalism whose content production can be taken advantage of by many other media and forms of communication. 
 
The creation of content requires a professional team with the capacities to develop quality programs and interviews. Vuelan las Plumas consists in generating and broadcasting live via radio and TV, and then uploading the content produced to the website to be downloaded by other communications media professionals and the wider public. To achieve this, capacity building is essential. ...

Khorixas, with an estimated population of 68,735 people, is one of the lest developed parts of Namibia. This town and the neighbouring villages receive no daily newspapers and only intermittent radio coverage from one state-owned station. Khorixas therefore lacks a community platform to discuss development and social issues in a pluralistic, accessible and democratic way and is isolated from regional, national and international affairs.
 
There have been recurring and unmitigated resource-based conflicts over the years between the region’s diverse communities. In addition, the...

Valley FM is a community-based radio that broadcasts from Worcester, Western Cape, where radio is the most accessible and cost-effective communication medium for the mostly farm-dwelling residents. As of 2013, the station had 121,000 listeners across 28 towns in a region where community issues are marginalized in media coverage by the national broadcaster. Valley FM broadcasts in three languages - Afrikaans (80%), isiXhosa (15%) and English (5%) – and covers local concerns that may not feature in national news, such as domestic violence and teenage pregnancy. The station also has a strong...

Bangladesh’ campaign for the right to information (RTI) has ensued for many years, sustained by the efforts of journalists, development workers, human rights activists and members of civil society. It resulted in the passing of the RTI Ordinance in 2008, a major step towards enabling access to information and promoting freedom of expression and of the press, good governance, and transparency. However, no significant efforts have been made to either raise awareness about or effectively implement this Act, and access to information remains limited in Bangladesh.
 
A media...

In order for journalism to foster sustainable development, media professionals require the right skills and equipment to develop communication strategies that serve their communities. However, capacity-building opportunities are often lacking. This project will therefore train community radio workers to implement communication strategies that promote sustainable community development and local participation. The training will draw upon UNESCO’s Media Development Indicators concerning professional capacity-building. The Model Curricula for Journalism Education: A Compendium of New Syllabi...

Portsmouth, one of the most populous communities in Dominica, has limited access to media since there are no community-owned outlets serving that region and only limited low-cost options available. This project will therefore provide the necessary equipment and training to establish a community-owned radio outlet. The station is projected to reach over 6,000 listeners across the town of Portsmouth and its environs. It will empower citizens by enabling immediate and affordable access to information on relevant issues as well as the promotion of culture. 
 

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