IPDC project priority: Community Media Development

The media in Somalia has grown despite the chaos that ensued after the fall of the military government of General Siad Bare. In Mogadishu alone, there are over 10 independent radio stations, more than 20 privately-owned newspapers and more than 30 Somali websites on the internet, but all of these media outlets are directed by men who also occupy positions of authority. Women neither sit at the decision-making organs of these media institutions nor work as managing directors, editors and owners. Women journalists do not receive the same opportunities as their male counterparts in terms of...

The media landscape in Uganda (including new media) is characterized by diversity, independence and sustainability. The number of licensed Radio stations as at July 2010 is 244. Out of these, only eight are community based radio stations. In reference to the African Media Barometer Uganda report 2010, the editorial independence of print media is protected adequately against undue political interference. A number of universities offer degree courses in journalism. One, Makerere, has a Master’s programme. In 2002, the Eastern Africa Media Institute – Uganda Chapter developed a National...

The Kingdom of Lesotho is a small, landlocked and mountainous country with LDC status in Southern Africa. It is totally surrounded by its only neighbour, South Africa. Currently it has two state-owned radio stations which broadcast countrywide. In addition, there are eight privately-owned stations, three of which are run by church organizations, one by the National University of Lesotho, and the remaining four by commercial broadcasters. Most of these radio stations broadcast in and round Maseru. State television is only accessible via satellite (which must be paid for), and contains a...

This IPDC project proposal seeks support to build the capacity of the community radio sector in Namibia through a practical training, support and mentorship programme that will benefit marginalised communities in Namibia through participatory programme production. Further to UNESCO’s intervention to promote and support the Namibian community radio network and to enhance the capacity of radio practitioners to drive the development agenda, this project will extend the results of the Namibian Community Network Stakeholders Meeting and take forward the findings of the Community Broadcasting...

Since 2008 South Africa has experienced several spates of xenophobic attacks. Tensions between South Africans and foreign nationals living in townships and/or informal settlements are continuing to rise to alarming levels, and the media has gone little way to diffusing the situation. According to Blank and Bucholz’ article published in Research News: Xenophobia in South Africa, xenophobic attacks are fuelled by, amongst other factors, a failure on the part of the media to facilitate peace and harmonious living between the South African locals and the foreign nationals. Instead of...

Community Radio faces many challenges, ranging from unfavourable legislative environments to weak governance and poor sustainability. The advent of community radio was motivated by the empowerment of poor and marginalized communities. Given the relevant role played by community radios in promoting human development, good governance, social justice, empowerment of women and human rights, it is important to promote stronger partnerships, collaboration and harmonization among them. AMARC Africa has identified as a key programme area in the development and capacity building of effective...

Since the 90s, with the advent of democratic process and successive government action taken to open up the audio-visual sector, great strides have been made in the Central African media landscape. The implementation of community-radio development programmes, supported by the UNESCO subregional office in Yaoundé, has led to the establishment of several community radios. Today, the country boasts close to 100 community and rural radios, as well as a 40-member national network of community radio operators—the ReRaC—, which seeks to promote good governance, and the conservation and sustainable...

This project will put in place a “community radio caravan” that will visit locations with existing or potential community media outlets in the Kyrgyz Republic. The caravan's team will consist of representatives from existing community radios, who will share their experience with the host communities. This 10-day activity will help to foster the network of community media initiatives and build capacity for peer-to-peer assistance. Exchanging and comparing best-practice experience will strengthen the commitment for cooperation and dialogue among the community radio initiatives and minimize...

The importance of community-access radio in promoting social and community development, basic education, and models of good governance has been widely acknowledged in the international community. According to the World Association of Community Broadcasters’ 2007 report on community radio (CR) and its social impact, this form of development communication has contributed to poverty reduction and sustainable development, fostered broader non-partisan political communication within countries (including peace building and conflict resolution), helped to engage marginalized or excluded...

Cambodia is still suffering from the effects of the genocidal Khmer Rouge regime of the 1970s and the ensuing years of civil strife. The legacy of these historical factors is manifold, but two major effects are the prevalence of a voiceless and fragmented civil society, unable or unwilling to speak up about basic rights, and the continuation of repressive or corrupt state systems. This is particularly noticeable in the constraints placed upon freedom of expression and media plurality in Cambodia. The adoption of the new penal code in 2010 potentially limits freedom of expression and...

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