IPDC project priority: Community Media Development

Throughout the 1990s, the media landscape in Burkina Faso experienced significant growth, both in quantitative and qualitative terms. This was a natural consequence of the ongoing processes of democratisation, decentralisation and media liberalisation. To enable the free and fair practice of media-related activities, an Information Code was adopted in 1991, and a regulatory body: the Conseil Supérieur de la Communication (Higher Council for Communication), established in 1995. In terms of audio-visual media, Burkina Faso boasts 138 radio stations and 20 television channels. Print-media...

The Republic of Mali boasts a legal framework which, since 1991, has fostered the emergence of a vibrant and diversified media sector. The country counts 300 hundred radio stations—associative, community and commercial—, 19 of which broadcast out of the Kayes region alone. The population of Mali is mainly rural: more than 85% of the country's inhabitants live in rural areas. The high illiteracy rate accounts for the fact that radio is still the most effective means of disseminating information, raising awareness and educating the general public.
 
The project's immediate...

Until the late 1980s, the only media outlets in Niger were those operated by the State, i.e. the national radio broadcasting service La Voix du Sahel), the national television service (Télé Sahel), a state-run daily (Le Sahel) and 1 weekly (Sahel-Dimanche). The emergence of a pluralistic media began with the introduction of the democratic process in the early 90s. Today, the country boasts 35 privately owned radio stations, 127 community radios, 3 foreign FM radio stations, 6 privately-owned and 2 publicly-owned television channels. Despite the increase in the number of media outlets, the...

Radio is acknowledged as the most widespread electronic communication medium in the world and the most convenient and affordable means of reaching the world’s populace, particularly in very remote areas. Recent surveys on Audience-Scape (2010) carried out by InterMedia show that radio is an indispensible tool in Kenya for delivering development information. Nearly all Kenyans are radio listeners, and nearly all of these listeners said they use this medium as a regular source of news and information: 89 percent of Kenyan adults get news and information from the radio on at least a weekly...

The media in Somalia has grown despite the chaos that ensued after the fall of the military government of General Siad Bare. In Mogadishu alone, there are over 10 independent radio stations, more than 20 privately-owned newspapers and more than 30 Somali websites on the internet, but all of these media outlets are directed by men who also occupy positions of authority. Women neither sit at the decision-making organs of these media institutions nor work as managing directors, editors and owners. Women journalists do not receive the same opportunities as their male counterparts in terms of...

The media landscape in Uganda (including new media) is characterized by diversity, independence and sustainability. The number of licensed Radio stations as at July 2010 is 244. Out of these, only eight are community based radio stations. In reference to the African Media Barometer Uganda report 2010, the editorial independence of print media is protected adequately against undue political interference. A number of universities offer degree courses in journalism. One, Makerere, has a Master’s programme. In 2002, the Eastern Africa Media Institute – Uganda Chapter developed a National...

The Kingdom of Lesotho is a small, landlocked and mountainous country with LDC status in Southern Africa. It is totally surrounded by its only neighbour, South Africa. Currently it has two state-owned radio stations which broadcast countrywide. In addition, there are eight privately-owned stations, three of which are run by church organizations, one by the National University of Lesotho, and the remaining four by commercial broadcasters. Most of these radio stations broadcast in and round Maseru. State television is only accessible via satellite (which must be paid for), and contains a...

This IPDC project proposal seeks support to build the capacity of the community radio sector in Namibia through a practical training, support and mentorship programme that will benefit marginalised communities in Namibia through participatory programme production. Further to UNESCO’s intervention to promote and support the Namibian community radio network and to enhance the capacity of radio practitioners to drive the development agenda, this project will extend the results of the Namibian Community Network Stakeholders Meeting and take forward the findings of the Community Broadcasting...

Since 2008 South Africa has experienced several spates of xenophobic attacks. Tensions between South Africans and foreign nationals living in townships and/or informal settlements are continuing to rise to alarming levels, and the media has gone little way to diffusing the situation. According to Blank and Bucholz’ article published in Research News: Xenophobia in South Africa, xenophobic attacks are fuelled by, amongst other factors, a failure on the part of the media to facilitate peace and harmonious living between the South African locals and the foreign nationals. Instead of...

Community Radio faces many challenges, ranging from unfavourable legislative environments to weak governance and poor sustainability. The advent of community radio was motivated by the empowerment of poor and marginalized communities. Given the relevant role played by community radios in promoting human development, good governance, social justice, empowerment of women and human rights, it is important to promote stronger partnerships, collaboration and harmonization among them. AMARC Africa has identified as a key programme area in the development and capacity building of effective...

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