IPDC project priority: Community Media Development

The first community radio in Senegal was licensed in 1996, and the number of stations has grown since then. Senegalese community radios play a very important role and are strongly rooted in the local communities. They have a strong commitment to provision of information, to raising local awareness of social and economic affairs and to encouraging participation in local life. Some of them have thematic programme campaigns on issues such as HIV/AIDS awareness, prevention of malaria, adult literacy, women's rights, peace in Casamance and care of the environment. The community radios broadcast...

The lack of adequate means of communication and information is an acute problem in the DRC in general, and particularly in the South Kivi province, whose population is forecasted at 4,101,249 inhabitants by 2010. Despite the presence of 2 public radio stations, 6 commercial stations, 2 newspapers, and the 5 foreign radio stations which broadcast in this area, information is only received by a tiny proportion of th epopulation, because practically all these broadcasters are based in Bukavu and only provide coverage for the town and privileged areas on its periphery. The media environment...

Nowadays there is no exact information about the quantity of local television stations broadcasting in the country, neither renting small air-time spaces to the biggest companies nor remaining in local companies. This situation also means an insufficient effort for local production and a big opportunity for foreign programming. National broadcasting of knowledge about Nicaragua and Nicaraguans, their culture, customs, facts, places, etc., through television is practically inexistent and this both facts together implies a transculturization of the audience and of course a lack of cultural...

The project aims at establishing and operate a sustainable and comprehensive Community Multimedia Centre (CMC) serving the pastoral community in 14 villages in Ngorongoro district, where 70,000 people live, forming a media platform meeting local development needs. The aim is to increase the diversity of media in the country, and ensure access to information to the community and from the community to the Tanzanian leaders. This proposal seeks support to acquire equipment and provide initial training to the personnel who will operate the station. The Ngorongoro district is highly remote and...

In El Salvador, after the civil war and the Peace Accords (1992), there has been a new era for democracy and the implementation of new media outlets. However, some of these media projects, over time, have disappeared and others still face critical financial challenges for sustainability. Today, there are about 200 radio stations in the AM and FM bands -20 of these stations are self-defined as community radio, 4 major daily newspapers, about 16 television stations in VHF and UHF, and at least 3 online weekly newspapers. Nevertheless, there are some concerns about the level of media...

As for the level of media development in the country we can say that Zanzibar particularly Pemba island the place we operate is not doing well. Although the law permits the existence of media pluralism but practically still the media area is dominated by government media. These media most of the time is a mouth piece of government and the voice of ordinary people is rarely got chance to be aired. In addition to that few private FM stations that have been established recently cover very small area and many people remain unserved. Worse enough media professionals in both private and...

In Costa Rica, medias are well developed, but they do not always coincide with the democratic spirit of the country. It counts with almost 110 radio stations that broadcast their programmes, but they are still generally concentrated in the central part of the country, although the community radios make the exception. There is a large variety of weekly reviews and publications, but their news coverage remains limited, and sometimes with very low quality. The new media tools, based on the Internet, begin to get certain relevance, although it is still below the level reached by more developed...

Although deliberate attempts have been made to cater to the needs of female listeners, these have not been able to meet the required expectations and standards, because of their limited coverage in radius and area. As national issues of priority emerge, they often tend to override the specific geo-political concerns of individual communities. This community multi-media project is designed to offer an avenue to rural communities to specifically discuss and address issues of concern to them. It would also empower the women and youth by providing an effective communication channel at their...

In terms of broadcasting, all stations in Sarawak are either under the Information Ministry or commercial broadcasters, leaving no room for community media. Strong laws such as the Printing Presses and Publications Act and the Official Secrets Act prevent the media from being independent and plural. Communities that lack resources or political connections cannot have their own newspaper or radio station. As a result, there are no community media in any format that exist to support indigenous communities and individuals. Newspapers in Sarawak seldom report on controversies concerning...

Media houses in the region basically focus on the bottom line, profit maximisation. Development issues such as climate change generally do not receive the amount of air coverage they deserve. This is partially due to the high cost of air time but more importantly the high cost of producing televisions programmes in the region. Additionally there is scarcity of journalists trained to report on environmental issues, particularly climate change. Most television content on the environment broadcast in the Caribbean is extra-regional in origin. The material tends to be educational, informative...

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