IPDC project priority: Community Media Development

While established and secure, the media industries in Jamaica see little competition from new or different organizations in their markets. In addition, there are very few local and community mediums to address relevant issues not covered by the major outlets. This is especially true in rural areas, such as Spring Village in rural St. Catherine. Jamaica is also currently experiencing an exponential rise in its use of and reliance upon computers and the internet. This trend has correlated with the embracement of several types of digital media that have until recently been associated with...

The main problems confronting Haitian community media are a lack of equipment; high cost of internet access in Haiti; the poverty of the communities; insufficient problem of electricity supply, especially in remote areas; training of young coordinators; and the lack of legislation on community media. The development and strengthening of a network of community radios in remote regions of the country would contribute to the creation of a pluralist society and to fostering equal access to information. Such a network would therefore constitute an essential and effective strategy for achieving...

In Namibia rural dwellers in the remote areas do not have a platform to present their voices of concerns in a language they understand to those delegated with the responsibility to govern them. However, only few indigenous language newspapers currently exist in Namibia, such as the Caprivi Vision newspaper, which is published in English and Silozi and mainly distributed in the Caprivi region. The lack of training skills in news reporting, graphic design, marketing management and the lack of equipment such as printing facilities and computers still hinder the publication from improving its...

Media pluralism is a recent phenomenon in Chad, so much so that, as is often the case in countries in which pluralism of expression is embraced against a backdrop of poverty, the professional challenges are multiple. Today, however, the Chadian media can be viewed as a vanguard in pluralism of expression. Nevertheless, Chadian journalists are threatened and arrested in the exercise of their profession, and the media landscape is characterized by a lack of training among journalists, in writing for radio for production techniques, and among first-level maintenance technicians, as well as a...

Delays in the area of communication still persist, particularly in rural zones, some of which are still very isolated. Additionally, the Eastern zone, near the border with the Central African Republic, has attracted thousands of refugees fleeing the troubles in their country. The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has set up 72 sites to provide shelter for the refugees. To cope with the situation, the World Food Programme (WFP) has implemented communication and foodsupply policies targeting the refugees at the 72 sites. Agents using motorcycles purchased by...

The media boom in Uganda is concentrated in urban areas, elitist, and commercially driven. The rural poor and illiterate are generally excluded as they don't influence or, participate actively in the programmes; the programmes do not promote their cultural identity, basic developmental needs like, primary healthcare, good governance at local levels, basic public education, agriculture or trade but instead focus on popular global issues. The establishment of the first Ugandan telecentre at Nakaseke (1997) and later upgraded by UNESCO into a CMC, opened a ray of hope and opportunity for the...

Media houses in the region basically focus on the bottom line, profit maximisation. Development issues such as climate change generally do not receive the amount of air coverage they deserve. This is partially due to the high cost of air time but more importantly the high cost of producing televisions programmes in the region. Additionally there is scarcity of journalists trained to report on environmental issues, particularly climate change. Most television content on the environment broadcast in the Caribbean is extra-regional in origin. The material tends to be educational, informative...

Somalia's media has evolved since it first blossomed in 1991, with private newspapers that were aimed at a rather narrow urban, literate and politicized elite, up to the time when it became a much more populist, commercial and community-based media with a tendency to side with various clans. The increase in the number of media outlets has corresponded with the arrival on the labour market of a generation of journalists, unskilled in either the basics of the profession or its ethical requirements. May be the largest obstacle to professional reporting remains the lack of education and...

Due to geographical barriers (enclaves, dense forest,?), the radio broadcasting media cannot cover the entire national territory, or at least inhabited zones. The Dienga district and its environs is in one of these uncovered zones. What this means is that only a fraction of the population has access to information, and then with great difficulty. Community radio is therefore seen as an effective alternative for enabling public access to information. While the press receives grants from the State, this is not the case for radio and television. As such, despite the importance of community...

Under this project, the skills and capacity of CR personnel will be increased through a training program, a newsletter and a web portal. The project aims to enable CR personnel to produce and broadcast CR programs, and successfully manage and run CR stations for the rural and marginalized communities. One-hundred and eighty organizations have applied for a CR license. To facilitate the registration and operation process, BNNRC has opened a help desk and set up a Community Radio Academy (CRA). It has been observed that skilled manpower is lacking to run the CR stations. While setting up CR...

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