IPDC Project implementation status: Implementation completed

Since the liberalization of the waves in the year 2000, the media landscape of Rwanda has been able to record considerable changes in terms of number of press houses and the quality of their programmes. Lately there are more than 30 of radio stations, 2 TV channels, more than 40 newspapers and several online media. Two new laws are also in place, law n° 02/2013 of 08/02/2013, on auto-regulation of the media and law n° 04/2013 of 08/02/2013 on access to information.
 
In spite of this changing media landscape, there is a severe lack of information on environment and the effects...

Community media or the third tier of broadcasting is increasingly being regarded as an essential tool for good governance, transparency, accountability and a means for reaching less accessible social groups. The potential contribution of community media is particularly significant in land-locked countries like Bhutan, with mountainous and sometimes inaccessible terrain, a modest but scattered population, and marked urban-rural disparities.
 
In 2010, the Royal Government of Bhutan partnered with UNESCO to conduct a Media Development Assessment (MDA) to assess the country’s...

The media in Rwanda is developing fast with 43 broadcasting media (radio and television) of which 8 radio stations and 1 television station are state-owned and 35 radio stations are privately owned. On the other hand, out of 42 registered print media outlets operating in Rwanda, 40 print media outlets are privately owned whereas the remaining 2 are state owned. 
 
While the media outlets may expand or that competition may compel a consolidation of newspapers into a few but more viable newspaper outlets, effecting professional standards and quality of the media has been...

Ravaya is a, journalist-owned newspaper in Sri Lanka that has, for over a quarter century, has withstood the political pressures to which almost all the vernacular press has capitulated to. Ravaya has a proud record of standing – and fighting – for justice, fairness and equality in the finest traditions of journalism with peer scrutiny and responsiveness to the readers. It continues to do so during the post conflict turbulent period where authorities and privately owned newspapers have been arousing triumphalist anti-minority attitudes among the majority Sinhala community. In an atmosphere...

Somalia is often described as the world's top fragile state, a country that has been engulfed in conflict and remains volatile, severely affected by the impact of more than a decade of civil strife. Currently the country is fragmented into South Central Somalia which is partially controlled by the newly-formed Somalia National Government, the internationally recognized government of Somalia, Somaliland which declared it’s independent from the republic of Somalia in 1991 and Puntland which declared itself as an autonomous state in 1998. The mandate of the previous Transitional Federal...

Thirty years after the adoption of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), many girls and women in the Commonwealth do not have equal opportunities to exercise rights recognised by law. In many countries, women are still not entitled to own property or inherit land. Social exclusion, “honour” killings, female genital mutilation, trafficking, rape, restricted mobility and early marriage among others, combine to deny women the right to health and increase illness and death for women throughout their life-course.
 
Under-...

The Uganda population census of 2002 found 23.8 million persons of which 11.6 million were male and 12.2 million were female. 88% of the women live in the rural areas that are served by the community media for information. Driven by gender inequalities in development initiatives, the government of Uganda developed a National Gender Policy to mainstream gender concerns in the national development process in order to improve the social, legal/civic, political, economic and cultural conditions of the Ugandan people, especially its women. The policy forms the legal framework and mandate for...

Ninety four journalists have been killed in Pakistan during last decade out of which 38 were shot dead in target killing. In 2012, eleven journalists including one TV channel driver were killed in three provinces, Balochistan, Sindh and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa of the country as impunity against Pakistani media rises to unacceptable levels. According to the figures compiled by the Rural Media Network Pakistan (RMNP) eight Pakistani journalists have been killed up to June this year. Due to this alarming situation, Pakistan has been identified as one of the focus countries for the UN’s Plan of...

Thirty years after adoption of the Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), many girls and women in East Africa still do not have equal opportunities to exercise rights recognised by law. Social exclusion, “honour” killings, female genital mutilation, trafficking, restricted mobility and early marriage among others, combine to deny women the right to health and increase illness and death for women throughout their life. Evidence indicates that Media can act as both a perpetrator and as a protagonist – it can either be an accomplice to gender based...

Pakistan has emerged as one of the deadliest countries for local journalists in last couple of years. The journalists face various dangers not only during covering assignments, but also the digital security of the journalists is constantly under threat. This loophole in digital security was widespread when the journalist Saleem Shehzad got murdered brutally. Saleem Shehzad was a contributor to an international online publication, and as reported his browsing records and information of sources was leaked through the hacking of his account, which looked suspicious to particular groups;...

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