IPDC Project implementation status: Implementation completed

There have been many recent cases of the Nepalese media failing to comply with norms of pluralism and gender equality. As a result, Nepal’s marginalized groups (namely women and ethnic/religious minorities) lack trust in the media and often feel their issues are not dealt with fairly. This project will therefore train journalists to promote gender equality and pluralism in the Nepali media so that they can provide balanced coverage on issues regarding marginalized and excluded communities. This project will contribute to a more objective, free, pluralistic and progressive media that will...

Fesmedia Africa's 2010 media barometer reveals that the journalism training at the University of Antananarivo does not include refresher programmes even though graduating students experience difficulties due to pedagogical shortcomings and gaps in the content of the initial training programmes. Furthermore, among the media professionals, the vast majority (more than 700) are trained on the job. One consequence of this is the plethora of articles based on sensationalism and a dull report of facts. This project aims to strengthen the capacity of a national pool of instructors from 6 public...

Nepal’s media sector is large and growing rapidly. However, many people are entering the sector without even basic journalism training. This is because there are few journalism training institutes in Nepal. To address this shortcoming and thereby improve the quality of the media sector in Nepal, this project will train new journalists from five districts of Nepal. 

There is a severe lack of information in the Rwandan media concerning the environment and the effects of climate change on agricultural production. Community radios have the potential to play a decisive role in filling this gap but lack the technical capacity to do so. If this skills shortage were addressed, educational radio programmes on the environment and climate change could reach more than 4,000,000 people from 15 radio stations, including rural communities, decision-makers and local leaders, enabling them to fully participate in environmental protection and take appropriate measures...

Bangladesh’ campaign for the right to information (RTI) has ensued for many years, sustained by the efforts of journalists, development workers, human rights activists and members of civil society. It resulted in the passing of the RTI Ordinance in 2008, a major step towards enabling access to information and promoting freedom of expression and of the press, good governance, and transparency. However, no significant efforts have been made to either raise awareness about or effectively implement this Act, and access to information remains limited in Bangladesh.
 
A media...

Although the media in Rwanda is developing fast, professional standards and product quality are not. Journalists lack the training required to carry out investigative journalism and instead focus on topics such as entertainment, sports and event reporting. A 2013 report by the Media High Council of Rwanda (MHC) highlighted journalists' overreliance on the voices of leaders (49%) to the detriment of other citizens (10%), in particular the police (6%) and other anti-corruption/crime bodies (3%). As such, one of the report's recommendations is for media practitioners to be trained in...

As a landlocked country with sometimes-inaccessible mountainous terrain, a scattered population and marked urban-rural inequalities, Bhutan would benefit significantly from community media. A UNESCO-commissioned feasibility study conducted in 2013 found a clear consensus among different stakeholders (including government officials) that commmunity radio (CR) would deepen and accelerate development in Bhutan. The report therefore asserted that a CR policy should be created. Other key recommendations included building the capacities of potential CR personnel, piloting three community radio...

The level of media development in Puntland, Somalia is low due to lack of resources and expertise as well as decades of war. Puntland State University (PSU) is committed to filling this gap and is ready to operationalize its Campus Radio Station. It has established a Media Training and Resource Centre, attained government permission for the radio station and, in 2011, equipment was procured by UNESCO. The station will cover community issues including, governance, rule of law, youth unemployment, environmental conservation, the plight of IDPs, piracy, FGM/C, terrorism and HIV/AIDS.

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In a climate of increasing authoritarianism and diminishing space for democratic debate, in which state-controlled media echoes official views and private-owned media self-censors and arouses anti-minority attitudes, Ravaya remains the only unbiased vernacular language newspaper available to the masses. This journalist-owned paper maintains an outstanding record of carrying out high-quality independent journalism, fighting for justice, welcoming peer scrutiny and being responsive to readers.
 
Ravaya, which currently circulates 25,000 copies per week, requires external support...

Many girls and women in the Commonwealth do not have equal opportunities to exercise rights recognized by law. Media coverage of women is insufficient and very often reinforces gender stereotypes. This project seeks to contribute to the third MDG (i.e. to “promote gender equality and empower women”) by building capacity and creating a network of PSBs and CSOs with a specific emphasis on gender development stories. The project also aims to raise awareness about gender discrimination and gender-based censorship within the media and to address stereotypes.

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