IPDC Project evaluated: No

Many Cambodian newspapers and private radio and TV stations depend on support from political parties. Although press freedom is not guaranteed, the government has declared support for press freedom, publicly praising the benefits to society of an unfettered media. There are no restrictions on satellite dish ownership and foreign radio broadcasts can be received easily from neighboring countries. The purpose of the project is to develop reporting skills in the provincial media in the Kingdom of Cambodia, which has been neglected by the tertiary education sector and other training...

The main problems confronting Haitian community media are a lack of equipment; high cost of internet access in Haiti; the poverty of the communities; insufficient problem of electricity supply, especially in remote areas; training of young coordinators; and the lack of legislation on community media. The development and strengthening of a network of community radios in remote regions of the country would contribute to the creation of a pluralist society and to fostering equal access to information. Such a network would therefore constitute an essential and effective strategy for achieving...

Bangladesh experiences an urban bias with regard to distribution of economic and social goods, and media is no exception. Only 16 percent of the rural population has access to newspapers, and local newspapers are published in urban areas and therefore do not focus on rural problems. However, the main part of the rural population in Bangladesh is facing some of the largest development problems so far due to climate changes. It is essential to involve these peoples in the country's process towards a more democratic and developed society. Furthermore, although Article 39 of Bangladesh...

The majority of journalists and other media professionals in these means of transmission do not have an independent capacity from the major companies which own most of the existing frequencies. This situation, among other things, does not facilitate the respect of freedom of expression at the national or local level. Since 2009, there has been widespread censorship, including the dismissal of journalists who do not share those changes, or closure of their programs, which is clearly a violation of their rights. This situation reinforces the perception of the country with a freedom of speech...

The proposal is framed by concerns about the severe repressions against the media and freedom of expression in Fiji, and fears across the region about the potential for a domino effect on other Pacific Island States. This project will therefore seek to address problems which weaken free media and pluralistic media development, while enhancing the professional capacity of media workers and their organisations, though provision of training identified as a key need for the region. By building on the experience of the IFJ, notably in South Asia, to create national and regional networks through...

New media is developing as an alternative to news in the Dominican Republic as traditional media (three major newspapers and two free dailies) seems more and more committed to the statu quo. In a moment where governmental pressure is becoming permanent news in the region, at a time when the economic crisis is hitting the traditional media hard with palpable consequences on the quality of the reporting due to strained working conditions for journalists and other pressures by the economic powers that have a say in the journalistic agenda; today, when new media is becoming increasingly...

We might find communities into which this technology and advances in communications are not reached. This situation tends to increase the levels of poverty and makes more difficult the achievement of real development of the rural communities. This is why there is a strong need to strength media communications in the communities, such as the creation of a bulletin board, information sheets, posters, community radio stations, newspaper articles, door to door flyers and magazine articles, which would allow the communities to rescue their form of living, their needs, dreams, achievements, and...

In Lao PDR, mass media has been gradually evolving. An increasing variety of types of media are being used, including newspapers, radio and television. There are both private- and government- owned media. Freedom of expression is guaranteed by the recently endorsed media law. In order to produce quality media, the skills of media professionals need to be developed. In 2004, a Mass Media Bachelor Course was initiated at the Department of Lao Language and Mass Media, Faculty of Letter, National University of Laos. Since its establishment, the Department has been playing a crucial role in...

In Namibia rural dwellers in the remote areas do not have a platform to present their voices of concerns in a language they understand to those delegated with the responsibility to govern them. However, only few indigenous language newspapers currently exist in Namibia, such as the Caprivi Vision newspaper, which is published in English and Silozi and mainly distributed in the Caprivi region. The lack of training skills in news reporting, graphic design, marketing management and the lack of equipment such as printing facilities and computers still hinder the publication from improving its...

Madagascar has a liberal policy towards the media, which has fostered the development of media pluralism and diversity. Currently, Madagascar boasts 198 public and private radio stations, 25 public and private television channels, and 28 newspapers (dailies, weeklies and monthlies). The online media, too, is a growth sector, with considerable potential for further development. With regard to reliable archive sources, the Malagasy media suffers from a lack of specialist professionals coupled with insufficient national coverage. Currently, skills are acquired either on the job, or through...

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