IPDC Project evaluated: No

This project will upgrade the professional skills of young journalists and graduates from the faculties of journalism of the Universities of the CIS countries: Azerbaijan, Armenia, Belarus, Republic of Moldova, Ukraine and Russian Federation engaged in the coverage of complex inter-ethnic, multi-confessional and cultural relations inside their countries and in relation with the neighbouring states. The main goal of the seminar is to show how to reflect the objective reality on these subjects in radio, print and electronic media: tactfully and with respect to the civil rights of an ethnic...

While established and secure, the media industries in Jamaica see little competition from new or different organizations in their markets. In addition, there are very few local and community mediums to address relevant issues not covered by the major outlets. This is especially true in rural areas, such as Spring Village in rural St. Catherine. Jamaica is also currently experiencing an exponential rise in its use of and reliance upon computers and the internet. This trend has correlated with the embracement of several types of digital media that have until recently been associated with...

Public broadcasters are among the most effective media in delivering knowledge on climate change mitigation opportunities and adaptation processes in raising public awareness through the dissemination of scientific data and options comprehensible by the public at large. However, most regional journalists know little or nothing about the issue of climate change and its effect on the viewers. The reasons why climate change issues are poorly covered or go unreported are many and complex. Journalists need more environmental training and networking opportunities. Environment, science and...

Central Asian countries have been broadcasting via independent systems since 1992, but governmental censorship of press freedom, weak media legislation and corruption present barriers for the development of non-partisan media. Practical training and programme production can help broadcasters in the region to fully engage with the access to information initiative by highlighting the public's rights in countries where freedom of information has been ratified. Involvement of state and private broadcasters on the topic of access to information could help increase populations' level of...

Although it looks like a pluralistic media landscape, there is a high concentration of both audiences and advertising revenue amongst nine media conglomerates (one TV network, two newspapers and six radio groups). In recent years the number of small, local and alternative media outlets has grown considerably both in the capital and especially in the countryside. Although many of the journalists working in small and local media lack formal training, they play an important role in their communities and in society at large. Many journalists would like to receive training to upgrade their...

Because Grenada does not have a tertiary level media training institution many of the journalists do not have formal training. Apart from a few older and more seasoned journalists, many media workers in Grenada are young and unqualified. One reason for this imbalance is that it is because it is very expensive to travel to CARIMAC in Jamaica for training. This has been a cause for concern amongst members of the Media Association of Grenada (MWAG) for a number of years. MWAG is also concerned that the salaries that currently exist in the Grenada media industry do not attract secondary school...

The media sector in the MENA region (Middle East and North-African countries) is experiencing an intense growth in terms of quantity of new players (privatisation in national TV sector and emergence of Pan-Arab satellite channels), which offer diversification, scope of action and technological progress. The existing training opportunities for journalists provided by the training and academic institutes operating in the region are not sufficient in comparison with the needs, in particular in the field of specialised training. The analysis of the current media landscape shows a large...

Despite the existence of a few privately owned journalism schools (85% of the establishments in the Haitian education system are privately owned), the majority of journalists are not sufficiently trained to enable the process of critical and investigative journalism. Moreover, most Haitian journalists--especially those in the provinces--do not belong to a professional association promoting their interests and development. Most of the journalists work in radio, which attracts more than 80% of the national audience. Although very dynamic, Haitian radio is severely affected by the low level...

The Press clubs located in the Federally Administrated Tribal Areas (FATA) are under-resourced and underdeveloped. There are seven independent press clubs in the FATA, with the membership of 250+ journalists working with the print and electronic media. In their current form, the press clubs primarily provide a 'journalistic identity' through membership to their members and a platform for the exchange of information. They do not provide a means of broad professional development. Nor is there any formal mechanism for the members of the clubs from different areas to share experiences with...

In Namibia rural dwellers in the remote areas do not have a platform to present their voices of concerns in a language they understand to those delegated with the responsibility to govern them. However, only few indigenous language newspapers currently exist in Namibia, such as the Caprivi Vision newspaper, which is published in English and Silozi and mainly distributed in the Caprivi region. The lack of training skills in news reporting, graphic design, marketing management and the lack of equipment such as printing facilities and computers still hinder the publication from improving its...

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