IPDC Project beneficiary type: Other

The purpose of this project is to promote local capacity building in safety and protection of journalists by reinforcing the existing monitoring network of the Swaziland Union of Journalists and Swaziland Editors’ Forum with a 3-day national seminar and creating social media tools for online safety monitoring and reporting. The proposed training will use the UNESCO produced “Model Curricula for Journalism Education: A Compendium of New Syllabi”, which incorporates a module on safety and journalism. Under this module, the workshop content will  be drawn from “Unit1” - Rights and legal...

This project will use the UNESCO safety indicators to research the safety issues impacting media practice in Liberia, which faces growing local and international concern. There will be a series of Monrovia-based expert interviews and focus group discussions targeting specific professionals with links to these safety issues, organized into four regional clusters.
 
This project is important given the current situation in Liberia. The last ten years have been characterized by peace and democratic renewal, with a growing number of media houses and improvement in media content as...

Evidence increasingly points in the direction of growing threats to the safety of journalists in Nigeria. This is highlighted by the claim by the Nigeria Union of Journalists (NUJ), the trade union and professional umbrella body of thousands of practicing journalists in Nigeria, that 13 journalists were killed in the course of assignments in the year 2012, representing the highest so far since the country’s independence in 1960. This is beside other forms of attacks, threats and intimidation. However, despite this apparent evidence, an outstanding problem is that of the absence of an...

The media have the potential to play a major role in raising awareness about environmental problems and in particular in educating the public about climate change. Doing so can help change attitudes and behaviour, such as the irresponsible dumping of toxic waste, which can help mitigate the effects of climate change.
 
In order for journalists to be able to fulfil this role, they must be familiar with the problems and able to present them in an understandable and interesting way. This is not the case in francophone Africa, where environmental issues are generally not valued (...

Niger has a free, pluralistic and independent media, which comprises, according to the High Council for Communication – the media regulatory body –, 2 state-owned newspapers (one daily and one weekly), 48 privately-owned newspapers, one of which is a daily, 1 state-owned radio station, 7 state-owned regional stations, 51 privately-owned radio stations with 37 relays, 133 community radio stations with 2 relays, and 18 authorised television stations with 23 relays, two of which are state-owned. To date, there are 133 community radio stations in Niger which hold a licence issued by the High...

The aim of this project is to promote the gender approach in order to contribute to the creation of an environment that is conducive to freedom of expression among women and radio broadcasters for more widespread popularisation of the culture of equality. One hundred and five external presenters and producers from 70 RIF-member radios stations will be trained in the concepts of gender, climate change and food security. After the training sessions, 70 programmes on climate change and food security will be produced, with the concept of gender as the overarching theme. The programmes will be...

The aim of the project is to strengthen the professional capacity of the community-radio journalists and broadcast presenters involved in collecting, processing and disseminating radio information; it seeks to strengthen the institutional framework of community radio stations by providing a solid basis for their independence, and thereby contributing towards the promotion of freedom of expression, the pluralism of ideas, and the diversity and quality of information provided to local communities. 

As a landlocked country with sometimes-inaccessible mountainous terrain, a scattered population and marked urban-rural inequalities, Bhutan would benefit significantly from community media. A UNESCO-commissioned feasibility study conducted in 2013 found a clear consensus among different stakeholders (including government officials) that commmunity radio (CR) would deepen and accelerate development in Bhutan. The report therefore asserted that a CR policy should be created. Other key recommendations included building the capacities of potential CR personnel, piloting three community radio...

On May 16th 2012, Brazil saw its Freedom of Information Law come into force. The text, approved by the Brazilian Congress after intense advocacy by civil society (mainly Abraji and the Right of Access to Public Information Forum), is one of the most comprehensive of the world. It includes municipalities, states and federal government and involves Judiciary, Executive and Legislative aspects. According to the text, most information must be made public in the Internet in computer-friendly format. The text also details the few exceptions to the new general instruction of transparency. But in...

A research summary report of the African Media Development Initiative (AMDI)14, indicates that literacy rates for urban areas of Tanzania average 35.4% and that the country has some of the lowest rates of access to Television and Newspaper based media across sub-Saharan Africa, with only 34% watching TV and 31% reading a newspaper at least once a week. The AMDI report also highlights low levels of professional, ethical, management and technical standards among media practitioners, which is attributed to: insufficient or poor-quality training institutions; rapid expansion of media outlets (...

Pages

Subscribe to Other