IPDC Project beneficiary type: Civil society organizations

Madagascar has been suffering from an unresolved political crisis since 2009 which has resulted in declining economic and human rights indicators and a widening communications gap between the Malagasy population and its leaders. With no mechanisms to ask for information, or hold their leaders to account, the population remains marginalised and disenfranchised from the democratic process with negative impacts on local governance. In the rural south in particular, where almost three quarters of the population are not literate, poorly educated and isolated, radio is the only source of...

In Mongolia, a long overdue Law on Gender Equality was passed in February 2011. The law is explicitly prohibiting any act of exclusion, restriction and discrimination against women in every sphere. The legislation obliges central and local governments, political parties, private employers including media organizations to install regulations and mechanisms to ensure gender equality and to fight sexual harassment, and introduce penalties to those who break them. The government has also set up a task force to draft a new Gender Equality Action Plan for the next 5 years.

In spite of ...

The media are essential to implementing the public information laws, enabling citizens to have a better knowledge of the current legislation, but they are also a tool for the exercise of journalistic activity in its role as watchdog of state institutions. Although Uruguay has an acceptable level of media development –considering its number of commercial, community and state radio stations and the number of existing newspapers- the same cannot be said about the diversity and plurality of the country’s media system as a whole. Among audiovisual media, private supply is thoroughly predominant...

Media and broadcasting institutions in Bolivia (at least 15 with national reach) are concentrated in two conglomerates : private corporations and state-owned media. Though community media has increased in number, it hasn’t yet developed the capacity to create independent content. This means that although there appears to be a wide diversity of media, the content production is reduced to a small group of journalists. This scenario restricts the exercise of freedom of the press and threatens the public’s right to access quality information. This situation is aggravated by the fact that...

The media panorama in Venezuela, as in the rest of Latin America, is facing major new challenges. The media reality in the Andean Region and in Latin America is in general similar. Most radio and television frequencies and the main newspapers are owned by a very few private companies. At the same time, Venezuela faces the challenge of taking responsibility for making the new information technologies (ICTs) available to all and to conveying knowledge properly to the most vulnerable, isolated population groups.

As community media arise, the problem that crops up is to train their...

Au Maroc, la réforme de l’audiovisuel engagée en 2004, n’a pas débouché sur le pluralisme médiatique escompté : le paysage audiovisuel demeure à ce jour restreint aux médias du pôle public et aux médias privés à caractère commercial. La suppression du monopôle de l'Etat en matière de radiodiffusion et la création de la Haute Autorité de la Communication Audiovisuelle (HACA), n’ont pas abouti à un cadre juridique garantissant la liberté d’expression et le pluralisme et la loi en vigueur ne prévoit pas l’attribution de licence pour opérer des médias audiovisuels à caractère associatif ou...

This regional project involves community women communicators in Mexico, Nicaragua and Guatemala, with the aim of equipping them with increased knowledge and tools to help end violence against women in communities, particularly against indigenous women. It is based on common characteristics that affect the lives of indigenous women in their communities. The project has been devised by representatives of the Women's Networking Association of Community Radio Broadcasters in all three of the above countries, but will be coordinated in Mexico. Women communicators in these countries have made...

Article 14 of Algeria's Information Act (no. 90-07 of April 3, 1990) provides for the freedom of all periodical publications. The abolition of the State's monopoly on print media brought in its wake a proliferation of publications. Several publications, however, are subject to the influence of political and business interests, which subverts their editorial independence. Furthermore, the State monopoly in the audio-visual sector continues to remain in force, after timid signs of opening up in 1990 and later in 1997. Although the absence of pluralism at the national level is compensated for...

The Republic of Mali boasts a legal framework which, since 1991, has fostered the emergence of a vibrant and diversified media sector. The country counts 300 hundred radio stations—associative, community and commercial—, 19 of which broadcast out of the Kayes region alone. The population of Mali is mainly rural: more than 85% of the country's inhabitants live in rural areas. The high illiteracy rate accounts for the fact that radio is still the most effective means of disseminating information, raising awareness and educating the general public.
 
The project's immediate...

Until the late 1980s, the only media outlets in Niger were those operated by the State, i.e. the national radio broadcasting service La Voix du Sahel), the national television service (Télé Sahel), a state-run daily (Le Sahel) and 1 weekly (Sahel-Dimanche). The emergence of a pluralistic media began with the introduction of the democratic process in the early 90s. Today, the country boasts 35 privately owned radio stations, 127 community radios, 3 foreign FM radio stations, 6 privately-owned and 2 publicly-owned television channels. Despite the increase in the number of media outlets, the...

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