Countries: Uganda

The project will target 80 practicing journalists comprising of radio managers, citizen journalists, radio presenters and talkshow hosts from Gulu, Lira, Kitgum, Soroti and Arua districts. Participants attending the training will comprise of 50% women and 50% males.The project will contribute to promoting good governance and transparency by building professional capacities in peace journalism in Uganda.

 

Provide skills and knowledge in peace journalism to 80 journalists (50% men and 50% women) working in media houses in Gulu, Kitgum, Lira, Soroti and Arua districts in...

Nearly 9 in 10 female Ugandans live in rural areas and rely on community media for information. However, only about one in 10 of the country’s community media reporters, producers and anchors are women. In order to address this gender imbalance, this project will raise awareness about gender issues and encourage women to actively participate in their communities, particularly as media professionals and leaders. The activities shall be implemented by the Community Media Network of Uganda (COMNETU). A series of 3-day workshops will be held on human rights and gender, community media and...

The media in Uganda has grown over the last three decades mainly because of liberalization of the sector which permitted individual ownership. This pattern implies an increase in the number of electronic and print media houses that widely recruited personnel to run these entities. Currently there are over 240 licensed radio stations in Uganda, although this figure is higher if the other 40 unlicensed are taken into account. Televisions currently operating number over twenty and newspapers stand at thirty. The context appears pluralistic given the statistics but this does not mean there are...

There are some 48 publications in circulation in Uganda, according to the official Media Council website, and 8 TV stations regularly on air with many more registered. Most of these stations are urban-based. The Uganda Broadcasting Corporation (radio and TV), government owned and controlled, struggles to operate as a public broadcaster, covering only 3/4 of the country. Community radio is weak and faces serious financial and human resource challenges. There are also barely any operational community newspapers or television stations.
 
While the growth in the broadcast sector...

The media landscape in Uganda (including new media) is characterized by diversity, independence and sustainability. The number of licensed Radio stations as at July 2010 is 244. Out of these, only eight are community based radio stations. In reference to the African Media Barometer Uganda report 2010, the editorial independence of print media is protected adequately against undue political interference. A number of universities offer degree courses in journalism. One, Makerere, has a Master’s programme. In 2002, the Eastern Africa Media Institute – Uganda Chapter developed a National...

Uganda is host to a number of institutions delivering journalism education, including the UNESCO-rated potential centre of excellence at Makerere University's Department of Journalism and Communication. However, whilst many practicing print journalists have attended professional training schools, the majority of radio journalists remain untrained. Furthermore, in spite of the available training opportunities, many journalists and editors continue to practice journalism which is insensitive to acceptable ethical norms and standards. This has led to recurrent breaches of core ethical values...

In recent years, Uganda has witnessed a liberalization and privatization of its broadcasting industry. In terms of radio, this led to an opening-up of the airwaves to provide a platform for political discussion among members of the public, giving constituents the opportunity to transmit their views on public policy to their representatives. This has greatly empowered local citizens to enhance their role in policy-making processes. The National Foundation for Democracy and Human Rights in Uganda (NAFODU) has built on this positive trend by collaborating with the Partnership for Transparency...

The media boom in Uganda is concentrated in urban areas, elitist, and commercially driven. The rural poor and illiterate are generally excluded as they don't influence or, participate actively in the programmes; the programmes do not promote their cultural identity, basic developmental needs like, primary healthcare, good governance at local levels, basic public education, agriculture or trade but instead focus on popular global issues. The establishment of the first Ugandan telecentre at Nakaseke (1997) and later upgraded by UNESCO into a CMC, opened a ray of hope and opportunity for the...

The Department of Mass Communication at Makerere University is pursuing several initiatives to contribute toward redressing some of these challenges. The mission of the Department's radio station Campus FM 107 is being expanded to focus on serving as a training radio station for broadcast journalism students, practicing professionals, and especially broadcasters working for community radios and other stations that target rural audiences. The U.S. government, through the American Centre in Uganda, funded the setting up of the radio station, but it still lacks some vital equipment necessary...

Pages

Subscribe to Uganda