Countries: Nepal

Nepal has a vibrant and rapidly growing media sector. According to the Press Council Nepal there are 89 daily newspaper and more than 381 weekly newspapers. In addition, according to the Ministry of Information and Communication, there are more than 326 FM stations and 38 Television channels in operation. Although the number of media houses and the number of people interested in making a career in journalism have gone up in recent years, there are still very few women journalists. According to the statistics of Federation of Nepali Journalists (FNJ), out of the total 9000 journalists, only...

In many rural areas of Nepal, Community Radios (CR) represent the only form of media available, providing services to the marginalized and disadvantaged people who have often been ignored by mainstream media. With the continued increase of the CRs, effective implementation of a Code of Conduct has become vital to build on self-regulatory mechanisms in enhancing CR professionals’ unbiased coverage, honesty, accuracy and reliability. This project will establish a mechanism to hold CRs accountable to play a greater role as a watchdog. Self-regulation is a function that lies at the very the...

Journalism education was initiated in Nepal in 1976 as the Journalism Department of the Tribhuvan University (TU) was established with support from UNESCO. Today, there are three universities and approximately 170 colleges giving training in journalism in Nepal, and the Nepali media landscape is thriving with thousands of newspapers and magazines, hundreds of radio channels and more than 30 TV channels. Journalism and mass communication courses are witnessing considerable demand from students with intent on pursuing careers in journalism and communication.
 
While the boom in...

Media in Bhutan has undergone considerable growth after the establishment of democracy in 2008. Today, mass communication in Bhutan encompasses both traditional and New Media technologies, ranging from newspapers, radio and TV to mobile phones and the internet. According to a UNESCO-supported Media Development Assessment (MDA) conducted in Bhutan in 2010, there are vital elements missing in the media landscape which need to be addressed. These include policy and legal frameworks to support the growth of media; Right to Information laws to ensure transparency and good governance; Fiscal and...

In recent years there has been an increase in the number of lawsuits filed against media professionals on grounds such as defamation, contempt of court, breach of parliamentary privilege, sedition, and breach of public morals and media ethics. This has exposed an urgent need for journalists to acquire an understanding of the legal environment in which they operate in order to protect themselves against such dangers. The Asia-Pacific Institute for Broadcasting Development (AIBD) is committed to addressing the issue of legal awareness among journalists in order to maintain plurality of...

Nepal's media sector has made great advances in the past two decades, with the introduction of laws ensuring press freedom paving the way for private and community involvement in the media. Today, more than 11 television channels broadcast from Kathmandu, and over 237 radio stations operate within the country, including a substantial number of community radio stations. Community radio has the proven potential to enable marginalized communities to exercise their right to knowledge and information, including them in policy and decision-making processes, and promoting the diversity of their...

There are hundreds of CLCs around Nepal, but only a handful of operative and self-sufficient CMCs. A proper network among these centres, starting from fewer districts, could become a fundamental awareness and information channel for communities. Although the quality and diversity of media are increasing in more populated areas, this is not true in remote areas. There, the often illiterate population has to receive information largely from local radio, and not enough quality information is available. CMCs practitioners have not received professional training, some are not well informed...

There is an enormous demand in the media sector for skilled media professionals. It is estimated that there are approximately 10,000 journalists working in Nepal, most of whom have not received any form of training. Following this project, NPI will have increased its the capacity to provide training to newspaper and radio journalists who live outside of Kathmandu and who do not have access to other media training opportunities. A major problem in Nepal is that the workforce in the media is largely unskilled. Untrained journalists are easily influenced and manipulated by political and other...

Following the peoples' movement for re-establishment of democracy in April 2006, Nepal has embarked on a sustained path to democracy respecting human rights, media freedom and free flow of information. Because of liberal government policy, more than four dozens community radios (CRs) were opened within the last eight months, reaching a total of 91, out of which 36 stations are already on air and 15 more stations will be on air by the end of October 2007. While professional training is a must for any fresh entrant in the media profession, the journalists of CRs are always constrained with...

With the success of CMC model in Tansen and for that matter in Nepal, the demand from the neighbouring villages has tremendously increased, not only to address the development issues and disseminate knowledge, but also to build the skills and capacity of ICTs. This model helps create media literacy with the community's participation. With many years of experience in this field and available human resources, CMC Tansen wants to replicate the same model in the entire Palpa Districts to the benefit of marginalised and disadvantaged community groups. The proposed solution is to build on...

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