Countries: Liberia

Liberia experienced a civil war which spanned fourteen years. Peace was brokered in 2003 and in 2005 an elected Government was installed. Since then a proliferation of print and electronic media institutions have developed in the capital Monrovia and other parts of the Country. Currently, there are more than thirty FM radio stations in Monrovia and about forty community radio stations strewn all over Liberia. There are five television stations and over twenty-five newspapers. The national broadcaster, Liberia Broadcasting System, which transmitted radio and television programs nationally...

Research conducted by various media development organizations has shown that women account for a mere 13 to 16 percent of the journalists in Liberia. A further survey conducted by Christian Media Center (CMC) showed that women hold a dismal one percent of clout positions in the media. The situation is appalling within community radio stations which are in the 15 political subdivisions of Liberia and provide information for over half of the overall population. Of 20 community radio stations assessed by FeJAL, only one has a female in a senior management position, and most of the women who...

Liberian media has grown in terms of numbers, but is left wanting in terms of quality. There are more than thirty daily, weekly, bi-weekly and other sporadically-produced publications on the newsstands; twenty radio stations, six television stations and over fifty community radio stations across the country. This development points to media pluralism, but the problem associated with this growth lies with professional standards and capacities of those who man these institutions to enable them to respond to the needs of the public. There are at least three universities in the country...

Like many other structures in Liberia, the media is faced with the challenges of post-conflict reconstruction. The Liberian media requires an extended period of revitalisation and professional development to be able to properly fill its role as the 'fourth estate,' including acting as a watchdog, directly contributing to good governance and poverty reduction, as well as functioning as a tool for conflict resolution. In addition, most Liberian journalists have little or no exposure to new technologies and trends in the media, leading to poor quality media products. Journalism training...

The media in Liberia requires a sustained period of engagement in the fields of training and institutional capacity building. The contents of media publications in Liberia today bears eloquent testimony to the lack of training opportunities open to the media. Journalists seldom counter-check their sources and only occasionally seek to go beyond a superficial review of events. In this regard, there has been an increasing barrage of criticisms against the poor quality of investigations into corruption and other issues of national importance by the media in Liberia. This field requires...

This project aims to upgrade the skills of journalists in order to effectively promote and enhance national development through attitudinal change.

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