Countries: Lebanon

Intense politicization is the primary obstacle to improving professionalism standards in the Lebanese media industry. It mainly affects objectivity, the very conception of it by Lebanese journalists and their actual commitment to it. One such indicator is the fact that very few news outlets distinguish the difference between news and editorial desks. Fact-checking is another point of contention which causes imbalances in the ethics guiding this line of practice. Though very few subjects are off limits; “physical access to news events can be restricted according to the political leaning of...

The Middle East/North Africa (MENA) region continues to rank poorly in terms of political rights, civil liberties and press freedom, with harassment and threats towards journalists and human rights defenders being a routine occurrence. Instead of improving, the situation is worsening with governments clamping down recently on online freedom of speech leaving journalists too afraid of retribution to report honestly and critically. The International Freedom of Expression Exchange (IFEX) works actively to fight this oppression of freedom of expression by emphasizing organizational capacity-...

In the early 1980s and during the civil war, Lebanon saw rapid development of its radio, television and print media in both the public and private sector. Since this time however, no effort has been made to establish a national code of ethics to serve as a guideline for journalistic work. Media institutions in the country today are largely owned by or affiliated with political parties, and the absence of a code of ethics means that journalists are not protected and do not have freedom of expression. In the past decade, two initiatives of codes of ethics have been proposed by private...

Lebanese media institutions not only have not played a calming, peace-bringing role during the unrest, but they conversely acted as a catalyst agent fuelling the already existing divisions and being the reason for more negative feelings. Indeed, the president of the Lebanese republic and the Lebanese army commandment were prompted to ask media institutions to practice control and restrain over what is broadcasted to the public in order to prevent unconstructive feelings among recipients. Thus, and in the light of the afore-mentioned situation, it becomes evident that there is a real need...

In general, state-owned media attract the largest audiences. Given the rapid pace at which technology is currently developing, it is vital for Lebanon's National News Agency (NNA) to focus on providing the best training programs and systems to better align employee skills and activities and keep the lead in the media sector, especially through its website. In order to create increased exposure and insure a better updated quality of news, the NNA needs to provide staff training for 15 employees in Internet and Computer usage, and online writing and editing skills. Those enhanced capacities...

This project intends to support community media in Lebanon in covering issues such as the environment, agriculture, industry, health, culture, education and other topics of general interest. In some regions, community media suffer from inadequate funding, lack of technical resources, insufficient professional training and consequently marginal production. Helping publishers and journalists upgrade their skills and boost their operations would enhance the impact of such media and enable them to provide diversity of content in addition to retaining their sustainability in a highly...

This project sought to assist the Daily Star Newspaper in Lebanon to organize specialized training courses for its management and journalistic staff.

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