Countries: Bhutan

With the rapid growth of the media industry in Bhutan, the demand for skilled and experienced media professionals is growing. However, due to the lack of training facilities in the media sector, the few trained and experienced professionals are thinly spread among the various organizations. As the country is undergoing a period of transition, it is equally important for media to act as a platform for public discourse.

Bhutan Media Institute was licensed by Ministry of Economic Affairs in June 2011 and subsequently registered as a training institute by the Ministry of Labour and...

Media in Bhutan has undergone considerable growth after the establishment of democracy in 2008. Today, mass communication in Bhutan encompasses both traditional and New Media technologies, ranging from newspapers, radio and TV to mobile phones and the internet. According to a UNESCO-supported Media Development Assessment (MDA) conducted in Bhutan in 2010, there are vital elements missing in the media landscape which need to be addressed. These include policy and legal frameworks to support the growth of media; Right to Information laws to ensure transparency and good governance; Fiscal and...

Both print and broadcast organisations display a lack in preparation of the young journalists to enable them to improve coverage of the country's newsworthy activities. To date, the two private FM stations only broadcast music and entertainment programmes. Efforts are on the ground to set up a Journalists' Association of Bhutan that will help in determining the training needs and guide the vision for long-term training in this field. An immense challenge facing the media today is professional training of journalists and limited knowledge on how to report news, feature stories,...

Bhutan is going through fundamental changes, and independent news, views and information affecting the Bhutanese society are of paramount importance. Freedom of speech, press and expression are new concepts in Bhutan. Only a strong presence of independent press can reinforce these ideals enabling a free flow of information and exchange. Otherwise, the news and information will continue to be dominated by the government media. The project envisages the establishment of a news and public service announcements (PSA) production unit, extension of the FM service to lower Wang valley (Talakha...

The project was proposed by the Bhutan Broadcasting Service to establish a remote community multimedia centre that would also function as a remote production bureau increasing decentralized inputs into the national service. With all BBS broadcast services originating in the capital Thimphu, remote community multimedia production centres in locations like Trashigang, in the far east of the country, are a major step forward in increasing pluralism and diversity of voices at a national level.

The Bhutan Broadcasting Service depends largely on short wave and medium-power FM transmissions to cover the difficult mountainous topography of the country. A large number of areas are not adequately covered through the current system. The project supported Bhutan Broadcasting Service (BBS) Corporation to cover three significant areas in western Bhutan with localized FM radio transmissions relayed from BBS' main 1 KW FM transmitters in Dobchula and Takti. The project provided funds to purchase small transmitters and associated installations with the aim of increasing both the coverage and...

The purpose of the project was to increase the quality of Bhutan Broadcasting Programmes by providing a linked computerized system between broadcasts studios to retrieve relevant library and archival material, to digitize audio content and train people on utilizing networked content to increase the quality of BBS production. This particular objective was identified among a number of other elements of the original project in order to maximize the project impact within the available funds.

This project was implemented over the period 1986-1994

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