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Normative, strategic and operational contexts of Openness and Inclusiveness stressed to achieve universal access to information and knowledge

News - Wed, 18/06/2014 - 10:57

The session was dedicated to analyze how access should feature in the post 2015 sustainable development goals. The session discussed both opportunities and risks involved in providing universal access to information and knowledge and concluded the following:

  • Clear-cut connection between access and development goals are lacking. Thus there is a need to examine the benefits of universal access within the broader context of sustainable development, viz, it's role in empowerment, enhancing human rights, and in dealing with "knowledge challenge".
  • The gamut of enabling mechanism to enhance accessibility is still poorly understood. Not least, access divide is a very poorly understood subject. Various aspects of the access divides are essential to be studied and internalized in the post 2015 development dialogues. This in essence can help consolidate understanding about accessibility, affordability, and equitable dimensions of universal access.
  • Available technological solutions need to be examined from their affordability, sustainability, and practicality. It needs to be understood that public policy instruments for these issues are already available, but their judicious use is still lacking.
  • There is a need for locally relevant content development to fuel the demand for access. Multilingualism must be respected while developing such contents,
  • Strengthening of the provisions to examine the sustainability of projects initiated to improve access to information and knowledge is essential.
  • Panelists also noted the need for the inclusion of Open Solutions, Open Standards, and stressed on the needs for special consideration for the people with disabilities.
  • "We may be talking about access within the broader context of the sustainable development goals but still a clear-cut connection between access and MDGs are lacking. ICTs and access always appear as annex to development discussion" Mr. Suman Prasad Sharma, Secretary of Ministry of Information and Communication and Head of the Delegation, Nepal.
  • "The relationship of access to local contents (or contents made available locally) is clearer, though, if the context of Internet peering and transit agreements (IXPs) is made explicit." dr. Mawaki Chango, CEO of DIGILEXIS
  • "We should not only look at social and technical issues, but also legal and ethical issue of access, Ms, Elia Armstrong, UNDESA.
  • "As much as Openness and Inclusiveness are important to achieve universal access to knowledge, Technological fix and policy fix are equally essential. Perhaps these are four sides of a cube" Dr. Andrew Taussig, moderator of the panel discussion.
  • "Sustainable development Goals should recognize access to information and knowledge as a supporting element for all focus areas" dr. Stuart Hamilton, iFLA
  • "The quest for universal access to information already has resulted in several low hanging fruits such as using Open Access, Open Educational Resources, Free and Open Sources Software, but the world continues to ignore these and debates on the philosophical issues" Bhanu Neupane, Program Specialist, UNESCO.

Normative, strategic and operational contexts of Openness and Inclusiveness stressed to achieve universal access to information and knowledge

News - Wed, 18/06/2014 - 10:57

The session was dedicated to analyze how access should feature in the post 2015 sustainable development goals. The session discussed both opportunities and risks involved in providing universal access to information and knowledge and concluded the following:

  • Clear-cut connection between access and development goals are lacking. Thus there is a need to examine the benefits of universal access within the broader context of sustainable development, viz, it's role in empowerment, enhancing human rights, and in dealing with "knowledge challenge".
  • The gamut of enabling mechanism to enhance accessibility is still poorly understood. Not least, access divide is a very poorly understood subject. Various aspects of the access divides are essential to be studied and internalized in the post 2015 development dialogues. This in essence can help consolidate understanding about accessibility, affordability, and equitable dimensions of universal access.
  • Available technological solutions need to be examined from their affordability, sustainability, and practicality. It needs to be understood that public policy instruments for these issues are already available, but their judicious use is still lacking.
  • There is a need for locally relevant content development to fuel the demand for access. Multilingualism must be respected while developing such contents,
  • Strengthening of the provisions to examine the sustainability of projects initiated to improve access to information and knowledge is essential.
  • Panelists also noted the need for the inclusion of Open Solutions, Open Standards, and stressed on the needs for special consideration for the people with disabilities.
  • "We may be talking about access within the broader context of the sustainable development goals but still a clear-cut connection between access and MDGs are lacking. ICTs and access always appear as annex to development discussion" Mr. Suman Prasad Sharma, Secretary of Ministry of Information and Communication and Head of the Delegation, Nepal.
  • "The relationship of access to local contents (or contents made available locally) is clearer, though, if the context of Internet peering and transit agreements (IXPs) is made explicit." dr. Mawaki Chango, CEO of DIGILEXIS
  • "We should not only look at social and technical issues, but also legal and ethical issue of access, Ms, Elia Armstrong, UNDESA.
  • "As much as Openness and Inclusiveness are important to achieve universal access to knowledge, Technological fix and policy fix are equally essential. Perhaps these are four sides of a cube" Dr. Andrew Taussig, moderator of the panel discussion.
  • "Sustainable development Goals should recognize access to information and knowledge as a supporting element for all focus areas" dr. Stuart Hamilton, iFLA
  • "The quest for universal access to information already has resulted in several low hanging fruits such as using Open Access, Open Educational Resources, Free and Open Sources Software, but the world continues to ignore these and debates on the philosophical issues" Bhanu Neupane, Program Specialist, UNESCO.

Normative, strategic and operational contexts of Openness and Inclusiveness stressed to achieve universal access to information and knowledge

News - Wed, 18/06/2014 - 10:57

The session was dedicated to analyze how access should feature in the post 2015 sustainable development goals. The session discussed both opportunities and risks involved in providing universal access to information and knowledge and concluded the following:

  • Clear-cut connection between access and development goals are lacking. Thus there is a need to examine the benefits of universal access within the broader context of sustainable development, viz, it's role in empowerment, enhancing human rights, and in dealing with "knowledge challenge".
  • The gamut of enabling mechanism to enhance accessibility is still poorly understood. Not least, access divide is a very poorly understood subject. Various aspects of the access divides are essential to be studied and internalized in the post 2015 development dialogues. This in essence can help consolidate understanding about accessibility, affordability, and equitable dimensions of universal access.
  • Available technological solutions need to be examined from their affordability, sustainability, and practicality. It needs to be understood that public policy instruments for these issues are already available, but their judicious use is still lacking.
  • There is a need for locally relevant content development to fuel the demand for access. Multilingualism must be respected while developing such contents,
  • Strengthening of the provisions to examine the sustainability of projects initiated to improve access to information and knowledge is essential.
  • Panelists also noted the need for the inclusion of Open Solutions, Open Standards, and stressed on the needs for special consideration for the people with disabilities.
  • "We may be talking about access within the broader context of the sustainable development goals but still a clear-cut connection between access and MDGs are lacking. ICTs and access always appear as annex to development discussion" Mr. Suman Prasad Sharma, Secretary of Ministry of Information and Communication and Head of the Delegation, Nepal.
  • "The relationship of access to local contents (or contents made available locally) is clearer, though, if the context of Internet peering and transit agreements (IXPs) is made explicit." dr. Mawaki Chango, CEO of DIGILEXIS
  • "We should not only look at social and technical issues, but also legal and ethical issue of access, Ms, Elia Armstrong, UNDESA.
  • "As much as Openness and Inclusiveness are important to achieve universal access to knowledge, Technological fix and policy fix are equally essential. Perhaps these are four sides of a cube" Dr. Andrew Taussig, moderator of the panel discussion.
  • "Sustainable development Goals should recognize access to information and knowledge as a supporting element for all focus areas" dr. Stuart Hamilton, iFLA
  • "The quest for universal access to information already has resulted in several low hanging fruits such as using Open Access, Open Educational Resources, Free and Open Sources Software, but the world continues to ignore these and debates on the philosophical issues" Bhanu Neupane, Program Specialist, UNESCO.

Normative, strategic and operational contexts of Openness and Inclusiveness stressed to achieve universal access to information and knowledge

News - Wed, 18/06/2014 - 10:57

The session was dedicated to analyze how access should feature in the post 2015 sustainable development goals. The session discussed both opportunities and risks involved in providing universal access to information and knowledge and concluded the following:

  • Clear-cut connection between access and development goals are lacking. Thus there is a need to examine the benefits of universal access within the broader context of sustainable development, viz, it's role in empowerment, enhancing human rights, and in dealing with "knowledge challenge".
  • The gamut of enabling mechanism to enhance accessibility is still poorly understood. Not least, access divide is a very poorly understood subject. Various aspects of the access divides are essential to be studied and internalized in the post 2015 development dialogues. This in essence can help consolidate understanding about accessibility, affordability, and equitable dimensions of universal access.
  • Available technological solutions need to be examined from their affordability, sustainability, and practicality. It needs to be understood that public policy instruments for these issues are already available, but their judicious use is still lacking.
  • There is a need for locally relevant content development to fuel the demand for access. Multilingualism must be respected while developing such contents,
  • Strengthening of the provisions to examine the sustainability of projects initiated to improve access to information and knowledge is essential.
  • Panelists also noted the need for the inclusion of Open Solutions, Open Standards, and stressed on the needs for special consideration for the people with disabilities.
  • "We may be talking about access within the broader context of the sustainable development goals but still a clear-cut connection between access and MDGs are lacking. ICTs and access always appear as annex to development discussion" Mr. Suman Prasad Sharma, Secretary of Ministry of Information and Communication and Head of the Delegation, Nepal.
  • "The relationship of access to local contents (or contents made available locally) is clearer, though, if the context of Internet peering and transit agreements (IXPs) is made explicit." dr. Mawaki Chango, CEO of DIGILEXIS
  • "We should not only look at social and technical issues, but also legal and ethical issue of access, Ms, Elia Armstrong, UNDESA.
  • "As much as Openness and Inclusiveness are important to achieve universal access to knowledge, Technological fix and policy fix are equally essential. Perhaps these are four sides of a cube" Dr. Andrew Taussig, moderator of the panel discussion.
  • "Sustainable development Goals should recognize access to information and knowledge as a supporting element for all focus areas" dr. Stuart Hamilton, iFLA
  • "The quest for universal access to information already has resulted in several low hanging fruits such as using Open Access, Open Educational Resources, Free and Open Sources Software, but the world continues to ignore these and debates on the philosophical issues" Bhanu Neupane, Program Specialist, UNESCO.

Normative, strategic and operational contexts of Openness and Inclusiveness stressed to achieve universal access to information and knowledge

News - Wed, 18/06/2014 - 10:57

The session was dedicated to analyze how access should feature in the post 2015 sustainable development goals. The session discussed both opportunities and risks involved in providing universal access to information and knowledge and concluded the following:

  • Clear-cut connection between access and development goals are lacking. Thus there is a need to examine the benefits of universal access within the broader context of sustainable development, viz, it's role in empowerment, enhancing human rights, and in dealing with "knowledge challenge".
  • The gamut of enabling mechanism to enhance accessibility is still poorly understood. Not least, access divide is a very poorly understood subject. Various aspects of the access divides are essential to be studied and internalized in the post 2015 development dialogues. This in essence can help consolidate understanding about accessibility, affordability, and equitable dimensions of universal access.
  • Available technological solutions need to be examined from their affordability, sustainability, and practicality. It needs to be understood that public policy instruments for these issues are already available, but their judicious use is still lacking.
  • There is a need for locally relevant content development to fuel the demand for access. Multilingualism must be respected while developing such contents,
  • Strengthening of the provisions to examine the sustainability of projects initiated to improve access to information and knowledge is essential.
  • Panelists also noted the need for the inclusion of Open Solutions, Open Standards, and stressed on the needs for special consideration for the people with disabilities.
  • "We may be talking about access within the broader context of the sustainable development goals but still a clear-cut connection between access and MDGs are lacking. ICTs and access always appear as annex to development discussion" Mr. Suman Prasad Sharma, Secretary of Ministry of Information and Communication and Head of the Delegation, Nepal.
  • "The relationship of access to local contents (or contents made available locally) is clearer, though, if the context of Internet peering and transit agreements (IXPs) is made explicit." dr. Mawaki Chango, CEO of DIGILEXIS
  • "We should not only look at social and technical issues, but also legal and ethical issue of access, Ms, Elia Armstrong, UNDESA.
  • "As much as Openness and Inclusiveness are important to achieve universal access to knowledge, Technological fix and policy fix are equally essential. Perhaps these are four sides of a cube" Dr. Andrew Taussig, moderator of the panel discussion.
  • "Sustainable development Goals should recognize access to information and knowledge as a supporting element for all focus areas" dr. Stuart Hamilton, iFLA
  • "The quest for universal access to information already has resulted in several low hanging fruits such as using Open Access, Open Educational Resources, Free and Open Sources Software, but the world continues to ignore these and debates on the philosophical issues" Bhanu Neupane, Program Specialist, UNESCO.

Normative, strategic and operational contexts of Openness and Inclusiveness stressed to achieve universal access to information and knowledge

News - Wed, 18/06/2014 - 10:57

The session was dedicated to analyze how access should feature in the post 2015 sustainable development goals. The session discussed both opportunities and risks involved in providing universal access to information and knowledge and concluded the following:

  • Clear-cut connection between access and development goals are lacking. Thus there is a need to examine the benefits of universal access within the broader context of sustainable development, viz, it's role in empowerment, enhancing human rights, and in dealing with "knowledge challenge".
  • The gamut of enabling mechanism to enhance accessibility is still poorly understood. Not least, access divide is a very poorly understood subject. Various aspects of the access divides are essential to be studied and internalized in the post 2015 development dialogues. This in essence can help consolidate understanding about accessibility, affordability, and equitable dimensions of universal access.
  • Available technological solutions need to be examined from their affordability, sustainability, and practicality. It needs to be understood that public policy instruments for these issues are already available, but their judicious use is still lacking.
  • There is a need for locally relevant content development to fuel the demand for access. Multilingualism must be respected while developing such contents,
  • Strengthening of the provisions to examine the sustainability of projects initiated to improve access to information and knowledge is essential.
  • Panelists also noted the need for the inclusion of Open Solutions, Open Standards, and stressed on the needs for special consideration for the people with disabilities.
  • "We may be talking about access within the broader context of the sustainable development goals but still a clear-cut connection between access and MDGs are lacking. ICTs and access always appear as annex to development discussion" Mr. Suman Prasad Sharma, Secretary of Ministry of Information and Communication and Head of the Delegation, Nepal.
  • "The relationship of access to local contents (or contents made available locally) is clearer, though, if the context of Internet peering and transit agreements (IXPs) is made explicit." dr. Mawaki Chango, CEO of DIGILEXIS
  • "We should not only look at social and technical issues, but also legal and ethical issue of access, Ms, Elia Armstrong, UNDESA.
  • "As much as Openness and Inclusiveness are important to achieve universal access to knowledge, Technological fix and policy fix are equally essential. Perhaps these are four sides of a cube" Dr. Andrew Taussig, moderator of the panel discussion.
  • "Sustainable development Goals should recognize access to information and knowledge as a supporting element for all focus areas" dr. Stuart Hamilton, iFLA
  • "The quest for universal access to information already has resulted in several low hanging fruits such as using Open Access, Open Educational Resources, Free and Open Sources Software, but the world continues to ignore these and debates on the philosophical issues" Bhanu Neupane, Program Specialist, UNESCO.

Normative, strategic and operational contexts of Openness and Inclusiveness stressed to achieve universal access to information and knowledge

News - Wed, 18/06/2014 - 10:57

The session was dedicated to analyze how access should feature in the post 2015 sustainable development goals. The session discussed both opportunities and risks involved in providing universal access to information and knowledge and concluded the following:

  • Clear-cut connection between access and development goals are lacking. Thus there is a need to examine the benefits of universal access within the broader context of sustainable development, viz, it's role in empowerment, enhancing human rights, and in dealing with "knowledge challenge".
  • The gamut of enabling mechanism to enhance accessibility is still poorly understood. Not least, access divide is a very poorly understood subject. Various aspects of the access divides are essential to be studied and internalized in the post 2015 development dialogues. This in essence can help consolidate understanding about accessibility, affordability, and equitable dimensions of universal access.
  • Available technological solutions need to be examined from their affordability, sustainability, and practicality. It needs to be understood that public policy instruments for these issues are already available, but their judicious use is still lacking.
  • There is a need for locally relevant content development to fuel the demand for access. Multilingualism must be respected while developing such contents,
  • Strengthening of the provisions to examine the sustainability of projects initiated to improve access to information and knowledge is essential.
  • Panelists also noted the need for the inclusion of Open Solutions, Open Standards, and stressed on the needs for special consideration for the people with disabilities.
  • "We may be talking about access within the broader context of the sustainable development goals but still a clear-cut connection between access and MDGs are lacking. ICTs and access always appear as annex to development discussion" Mr. Suman Prasad Sharma, Secretary of Ministry of Information and Communication and Head of the Delegation, Nepal.
  • "The relationship of access to local contents (or contents made available locally) is clearer, though, if the context of Internet peering and transit agreements (IXPs) is made explicit." dr. Mawaki Chango, CEO of DIGILEXIS
  • "We should not only look at social and technical issues, but also legal and ethical issue of access, Ms, Elia Armstrong, UNDESA.
  • "As much as Openness and Inclusiveness are important to achieve universal access to knowledge, Technological fix and policy fix are equally essential. Perhaps these are four sides of a cube" Dr. Andrew Taussig, moderator of the panel discussion.
  • "Sustainable development Goals should recognize access to information and knowledge as a supporting element for all focus areas" dr. Stuart Hamilton, iFLA
  • "The quest for universal access to information already has resulted in several low hanging fruits such as using Open Access, Open Educational Resources, Free and Open Sources Software, but the world continues to ignore these and debates on the philosophical issues" Bhanu Neupane, Program Specialist, UNESCO.

Legal Leaks training in Belgrade: Truth seeking requires skills

News - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 15:50

“Truth seeking requires skills,” he told the group of around 30 journalists present at the training from around the country.

The event was organized by UNESCO in cooperation with Access Info Europe, the Press Council of Serbia and the South East European Network for Professionalization of Media (SEENPM).

On the first day, Access Info Europe presented an updated version of the Legal Leaks Toolkit tailored to the Serbian legal framework and available in the local language. Journalists shared their experiences using access to information laws and raised several important issues, such as exceptions to the right to access information and the right of access to emails.

In the afternoon session, Natalija Cetkovic, Assistant to the General Secretary of the Commissioner, explained in detail the procedure for accessing information in Serbia. Some journalists took the chance to ask relevant questions such as whether a blogger is considered as a journalist under the Serbian access to information law. Vladimir Radomirovic, editor-in-chief of Pistaljka (The Whistle), a whistleblowing website that publishes investigative stories on corruption in Serbia, explained the challenges of leaking information in Serbia.

On the second day, the training focused on media self-regulation and data journalism. Ljiljana Smajlovic, President of the Press Council and also of the Journalists Association of Serbia (UNS), explained how Serbia follows the Norwegian model, encouraging balance and right of reply in articles even before they are published and seeking to ensure “fast, free, and fair” findings in case of complaints. Most papers were keen not to be found at fault by the Press Council. Their definition of journalism includes editorial intervention, in contrast with a blogger or citizen putting information online. The role of the editor includes ensuring compliance with ethical standards. She added that given the role of the media in Serbia’s recent history “we need to be even more fanatical about ethics than the Scandinavians.”

In another session, Aleksandar Djordjević, a journalist from the Balkan Investigative Reporting Network (BIRN), spoke about data journalism and gave practical information on which tools are available to help journalists analyse large volumes of data. Djordjević also presented the website Javno (“Public”), an open and searchable database containing thousands of documents on public spending, set up by BIRN in 2010.

Danko Nikolic and Marko Milosevic spoke about the information request website daznamosvi.rs (“For all of us to know”), the Serbian adaptation of the Alaveteli platform for requesting information from public bodies. They said the website was launched on 7 May 2014 and that all journalists are encouraged to make use of it.

The event took place in the framework of the EU-UNESCO project: “Promoting Media Accountability in South East Europe and Turkey,” which started in January 2013.

Presentation of the legal leaks contest

As part of the five Legal Leaks trainings that took place during the month of June across South East Europe, Access Info Europe and UNESCO, in partnership with the EU Commission, are organizing a contest for journalists who took part in these courses.

Journalists are invited to write a story based on one or more access to information requests they have previously made. The article must be written in English and up to 2,000 words. The jury will positively rate articles based on access to information requests filed in different countries. For details related to the training contest, please see: http://www.access-info.org/en/legal-leaks/579-legal-leaks-contest

Legal Leaks training in Podgorica focuses on media self-regulation and access to information

News - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 14:55

Long timeframes for responding to requests for information and complex appeals procedures were also concerns raised by the participants in the training, which took place on 12 and 13 June 2014 and was organized by UNESCO in cooperation with Access Info Europe, the Media Self-Regulation Council and South East European Network for Professionalization of Media SEENPM. The event gathered around 20 journalists.

Aleksa Ivanovic, council member of the Agency for Personal Data Protection and Free Access to Information, introduced the situation of access to information in Montenegro. The discussions then centered on the dilemmas of ethical and professional journalism and on the importance of exposing wrongdoings for a democratic society. Participants discussed various ethical issues regarding the tension between privacy and disclosure of information, with concrete examples such as land and company registers which contain private data but where there is also a countervailing public interest in knowing the information.

The second day focused on questions of journalistic ethics. There was a lively open debate from across the polarized Montenegrin media landscape, which has multiple self-regulation mechanisms including the Media Council and ombudspersons for some private newspapers and televisions. The discussion with Ranko Vujovic of the Media Council for Self-Regulation and Bozena Jelusic, ombudsperson of the daily Vijesti, included a debate on whether media are responsible for comments posted on their websites by members of the public.

Another issue was whether there is a difference between politically slanted media and professional media. The experts from Access Info noted that many media around the world have some kind of political or economic perspective, but that this does not prevent high quality journalism with rigorous fact checking.

Marijana Buljan presented the third report by Human Rights Action, an NGO that monitors and assesses the work of journalistic self-regulatory bodies in Montenegro. She noted that many complaints still come from political actors rather than members of the broader public.

“There is an acute need for media self-regulatory bodies to establish a debate on ethics and professional standards,” she said. “All self-regulatory bodies should implement the code of ethics objectively and evenhandedly. This is a crucial step forward for more balanced and ethical media in Montenegro.”

This event took place in the framework of the EU-UNESCO project: “Promoting Media Accountability in South East Europe and Turkey,” which started in January 2013. The training was the fourth in a series of events taking place in countries across the region.

While in Podgorica, Helen Darbishire and Victoria Anderica of Access Info Europe held meetings with journalists from the daily newspapers Vijesti and Dan to discuss their self-regulatory systems and issues of media ethics and media freedom. The Access Info team also visited MANS, an NGO that actively uses the access to information law in its work to investigate and expose wrongdoing and corruption.

“Legal Leaks”: Mejorar la responsabilización de los medios de comunicación en Europa sudoriental

Noticias - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:48

Este es el segundo año de implementación por la UNESCO del proyecto europeo "responsabilización de los medios de comunicación en Europa sudoriental", cuyo objetivo es reforzar los estándares éticos y profesionales del periodismo en Albania, Bosnia y Herzegovina, la ex República Yugoslava de Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia y Turquía, así como en Kosovo (administrado por la misión de administración provisional de las Naciones Unidas en Kosovo tras la resolución 1244 del Consejo de seguridad de la ONU).

En el marco de este proyecto, la UNESCO continuará los esfuerzos para apoyar el fortalecimiento de mecanismos de responsabilización de los medios de comunicación en la región, en lo referente a ciertos códigos de ética, a los consejos de prensa y a las Defensorias Noticieras. El proyecto tendrá como principales objetivos para 2014 la mejora de las habilidades de los consejos de prensa, creados recientemente, y de las Defensorias Noticieras, mediante la adaptación de los mecanismos de autorregulación a la era digital y la información sobre estos últimos.

Además, los periodistas de la región estarán capacitados para ejercer su derecho de acceso a la información en su país y así mejorar sus habilidades de investigación y de respeto a los estándares éticos y profesionales. Los entrenamientos "Legal Leaks",organizados por Access Info Europe y la Red de Europa sudoriental para la profesionalización de los medios de comunicación (SEENPM por sus siglas en inglés), habilitarán a los periodistas a utilizar regularmente las leyes nacionales de libertad de información en su trabajo y a proteger la seguridad de sus datos y fuentes confidenciales de información. Al mismo tiempo, los periodistas obtendrán formacion para resolver los dilemas éticos en materia de acceso a la información.

Todos los participantes recibirán una versión nacional de la "Legal Leaks Toolkit", que explica como presentar una solicitud de libertad de información y cómo apelar en caso de que esta sea denegada.

Los entrenamientos Legal Leaks para periodistas en Europa sudoriental se llevarán a cabo en junio de 2014:

  • Pristina: 2 y 3 de junio de 2014
  • Tirana: 4 y 5 de junio de 2014
  • Sarajevo: 10 y 11 de junio de 2014
  • Podgorica: 12 y 13 de junio de 2014
  • Belgrado: 16 y 17 de junio de 2014

También se ha previsto una conferencia regional que se celebrará en Skopje el 16 y 17 de octubre de 2014.

Las recomendaciones de los medios de comunicación de América Central para la Agenda para el Desarrollo después de 2015 de la región

Noticias - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:46

La necesidad de estas recomendaciones fue expresada el 5 de mayo durante la celebración regional del Día Mundial de la Libertad de prensa en San José, Costa Rica, en la que se reunieron más de 70 representantes de instituciones y organizaciones de medios de Centroamérica.

El encuentro, que duro todo el día, contó con mesas de debate y talleres sobre temas clave para el respeto del derecho a comunicar en la región, y se centró en los medios de comunicación comunitarios, la formación de los periodistas y los riesgos de seguridad para el ejercicio del periodismo en América Central. En los debates se expresó Juan Carlos Mendoza, Embajador de Costa Rica ante las Naciones Unidas, y algunos medios de comunicación alternativos y comunitarios de la región compartieron sus experiencias. Entre ellos, el centro de reportes informativos sobre Guatemala (Cerigua), la Radio Progreso y C-Free Honduras y la Asociación de periodistas del Salvador. La oficina de UNESCO en México participó en la reunión por Internet y habló del empoderamiento de los jóvenes a través de los medios de comunicación.

El evento fue organizado por la UNESCO, con el apoyo de la Embajada de los Países Bajos, el Instituto Interamericano de derechos humanos, el centro de comunicación Voces Nuestras, el Programa de Libertad de Expresión, Derecho a la Información y Opinión Pública (PROLEDI) de la Universidad de Costa Rica, la Fundación Acceso, el colegio de periodistas de Costa Rica, el Canal UCR, el Instituto de Prensa y Libertad de Expresion (IPLEX), OndaUNED y la Red de Medios e Iniciativas de Comunicación Alternativa (RedMICA).

Las  Recomendaciones han llegado en un momento oportuno, ya que las consultas nacionales con los nuevos gobiernos sobre la Agenda para después de 2015 están comenzando en varios países de América Central.

Los expertos en medios aplauden el nuevo informe de la UNESCO sobre la libertad de prensa, al que han sido añadidas reseñas regionales

Noticias - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:43

El informe analiza las tendencias de la libertad de prensa y el desarrollo de los medios de comunicación en función de cuatro dimensiones: la libertad de los medios de comunicación, el pluralismo, la independencia y la seguridad.

En asociación con la UNESCO, un  Grupo Asesor  de 27 expertos internacionales de la sociedad civil y académica ha contribuido con el informe, que fue  lanzado en Estocolmo  por el Director General de la UNESCO en marzo.

El informe provocó un comprometido debate a principios de este mes en la Conferencia Internacional del Día Mundial de la Libertad de Prensa , que se celebró en la Sede de la UNESCO en París los días 5 y 6 de mayo.

El Director General Adjunto, Getachew Engida, abrió la mesa de debate con una descripción de la singularidad de  las Tendencias mundiales de la Libertad de Expresión y del Desarrollo de los Medios de Comunicación. “Se trata del primer informe de este tipo en cubrir todos los temas relacionados con la libertad de prensa”, dijo, y añadió que “en él se expresa con claridad el alcance variable de los medios de comunicación en la era digital”.

"El estudio se centra específicamente en las tendencias", dijo. "Se trata más bien de un videoclip que de una fotografía, lo que facilita la comprensión de la libertad de prensa como un proceso en movimiento y el análisis de las trayectorias que nos impulsan hacia adelante. "

De acuerdo con Remzi Laniel, miembro del Grupo Asesor y Director Ejecutivo del Instituto de Medios de Albania, el informe constituye "una herramienta política y un mecanismo de difusión importantes."

Las reseñas regionales, recién publicadas, constituyen un marco que puede ser útil para todas las organizaciones de medios de comunicación, añadió.

"A veces, el compararse con los demás puede ayudarnos a entendernos mejor", constató. "Para lograr buenas prácticas, también es útil compararse a si mismo con nuestros vecinos y con las otras regiones."

Otros ven el informe como una oportunidad para estimular la investigación en un momento en el que los medios de comunicación están sufriendo una profunda transformación.

"Es más que un informe", dijo Rosental Alves, profesor de la Universidad de Texas en Austin. "Es un llamado a realizar más investigaciones a nivel regional, como una larga lista de cosas que podría ayudar a las universidades a averiguar lo que está pasando."

El informe analiza los principales avances de la libertad de prensa desde el año 2007 en todo el mundo, con estudios cabales sobre cada uno de los grupos electorales regionales de la UNESCO:

Se prevén eventos de lanzamiento regionales en los próximos meses en los Estados Unidos y la India.

El informe Tendencias mundiales de la Libertad de Expresión y del Desarrollo de los Medios de Comunicación se produjo con el apoyo del Gobierno de Suecia.

El informe Tendencias mundiales de la Libertad de Expresión y del Desarrollo de los Medios de Comunicación, así como las seis reseñas regionales, esta abierto al público y disponible en línea en http://www.unesco.org/new/world-media-trends.

Legal Leaks : Une formation pour renforcer la responsabilisation des médias dans le Sud-Est de l’Europe

Actualités - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:26

L’UNESCO débute la deuxième année de mise en œuvre du projet « Responsabilisation des médias en Europe du Sud-Est », financé par les Nations Unies, qui vise à consolider les normes professionnelles et éthiques du journalisme en Albanie, en Bosnie-Herzégovine, dans l’ex-République yougoslave de Macédoine, au Monténégro, en Serbie, en Turquie et au Kosovo (administré par la Mission d’administration intérimaire des Nations Unies au Kosovo, dans le cadre de la Résolution 1244 du Conseil de Sécurité des Nations Unies).

Dans le cadre de ce projet, l’UNESCO va poursuivre ses efforts en vue de renforcer les mécanismes de responsabilisation des médias dans la région, en particulier sous forme de codes de déontologie, de conseils de presse et de médiateurs. Le développement des compétences de ces conseils de presse et médiateurs récemment mis en place, l’adaptation des mécanismes d’autorégulation à l’ère numérique, et une meilleure connaissance de ces mécanismes, sont au cœur du déploiement du projet en 2014.

En outre, les participants bénéficieront d’une formation pour leur permettre d’exercer au mieux leur droit à l’information dans leur pays, et d’élargir ainsi leurs compétences dans le journalisme d’investigation, tout en respectant des normes professionnelles  et éthiques. Les sessions de formation Legal Leaks, organisées par Access Info Europe et le Réseau de l’Europe du sud-est pour la professionnalisation des médias (SEENPM), ont pour objectif d’inciter les journalistes à mieux utiliser les lois relatives à l’accès à l’information dans leur travail au quotidien et à sécuriser leurs données et leurs sources d’informations confidentielles. Les journalistes seront également sensibilisés aux dilemmes éthiques liés à l’accès à l’information.

Chaque participant recevra le kit Legal Leaks, adapté par pays, qui lui donnera des conseils pour déposer des demandes sur la liberté d’information et traiter d’éventuels refus.

Les sessions de formation Legal Leaks en Europe du Sud-Est auront lieu en juin 2014 :

  • Pristina : 2 et 3 juin 2014
  • Tirana : 4 et 5 juin 2014
  • Sarajevo : 10 et 11 juin 2014
  • Podgorica : 12 et 13 juin 2014
  • Belgrade : 16 et 17 juin 2014

Une conférence régionale est également prévue les 16 et 17 octobre 2014 à Skopje.

Pristina : première session de formation Legal Leaks sur l’utilisation des lois relatives à l’accès à l’information

Actualités - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:23

Afin d’aider les professionnels des médias à accéder à des informations détenues par les organismes publics, un séminaire de formation Legal Leaks a été organisé par l’UNESCO, en coopération avec Access Info Europe, le Réseau sud-est européen pour la professionnalisation des médias (SEENPM) et le Conseil de la presse du Kosovo. Une trentaine de journalistes ont pris part à cet événement, qui s’est tenu les 2 et 3 juin à Pristina, au Kosovo (tel que défini par la résolution 1244 du Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies).

Le droit à la liberté de l’information est un droit humain fondamental. De plus, les gouvernements et les institutions gouvernementales sont issus d’élections et payés par les contribuables. Le grand public devrait donc savoir comment s’exerce le pouvoir et comment l’argent public est dépensé. De manière plus générale, l’utilisation des lois relatives à l’accès à l’information peut dynamiser et renforcer le journalisme, et contribuer ainsi à l’amélioration de la qualité des débats publics, à une plus grande participation des citoyens aux prises de décision, et par voie de conséquence à l’émergence de sociétés plus ouvertes et plus démocratiques. 

Au cours du séminaire, les participants ont reçu un kit, destiné aussi bien aux journalistes de presse écrite, de radio et de télévision qu’aux blogueurs, avec des conseils sur les demandes d’accès aux informations détenues par les autorités publiques et le traitement des refus. Ce kit a été adapté à la législation du pays, et dans la langue nationale,  par des juristes spécialisés du BIRN Kosovo (Réseau du journalisme d'enquête des Balkans). Helen Darbishire, formatrice chez Access Info Europe, souligne que « les journalistes peuvent être amenés à faire évoluer les mentalités dans les salles de rédaction et à convaincre les éditeurs que, loin d’être une perte de temps, le dépôt d’une demande d’accès à l’information fait partie du travail quotidien des journalistes. »

Au cours de la seconde journée de formation, les journalistes ont assisté à une conférence de Ibrahim Berisha, membre du conseil d’administration du Conseil de la presse du Kosovo, sur les fondamentaux de l’éthique journalistique. Les participants ont également été formés à la protection de la confidentialité des sources et ont débattu des dilemmes éthiques relatifs au rôle des lanceurs d’alerte et aux fuites d’informations. Access Info Europe a animé un atelier avec des exercices pratiques sur la manière d’assurer la sécurité des données et vérifier la crédibilité des informations fournies par un lanceur d’alerte.

Cet événement a eu lieu dans le cadre du projet " La transparence des médias en Europe du Sud-Est ", financé conjointement par l'Union Européenne et l'UNESCO, qui a débuté en janvier 2013. Cette session de formation est la première d’une série d’événements qui se tiendront dans chacun des pays concernés par ce projet.

Le PIPT publie les résultats de son étude menée dans 17 pays sur l’ouverture aux FOSS (logiciels libres et Open Source) et aux solutions ouvertes

Actualités - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:21

Cette étude a été lancée en novembre 2012 par le Bureau de l’UNESCO à Kingston, et menée avec l’aide de deux sociétés de conseil caribéennes. Elle s’est attachée à différents aspects tels que les niveaux de connaissance, les politiques menées, le cadre législatif, et l’utilisation faite par les gouvernements, le secteur privé, la société civile et les personnes privées des logiciels libres et Open Source, des données ouvertes, des ressources éducatives libres et des normes ouvertes.

L’étude a montré que les différents pays de la région ont atteint des niveaux de développement très divers dans ce domaine. Au Belize par exemple, des activités de formation au niveau national ont été mises en place dès 1997, ce qui a contribué au développement de capacités significatives au niveau national, qui ont ensuite permis à des établissements tels que le Corozal Community College de proposer un éventail de services aux lycéens et aux adultes en formation. A Trinidad-et-Tobago, plusieurs portails de données ouvertes ont été mis en place dans les domaines de l’agriculture, de la finance et de la police. De nombreuses familles vivant de la pêche ont également pu bénéficier des retombées positives d’un projet innovant, le Fisheries Project.

Alors que de nombreux pays et territoires dans les Caraïbes concernés par l’étude disposent de politiques nationales en matière de TIC, à l’exception de la Barbade, du Guyana, de la Jamaïque, de Saint-Kitts-et-Nevis, de Sainte-Lucie et de Saint-Vincent-et-les-Grenadines, peu d’entre elles font référence aux logiciels libres et Open Source, et aux solutions ouvertes. Cependant, cette étude est intervenue à un moment opportun, car elle a contribué à faire prendre en compte, dans les analyses des politiques en cours, des besoins en matière de solutions ouvertes et de leurs avantages, ce qui a ensuite ouvert la voie à leur intégration dans les stratégies et les cadres nationaux. Néanmoins, même dans certains pays sans référence explicite aux TIC dans les politiques menées, des solutions ouvertes sont activement utilisées, par exemple à Antigua-et-Barbuda, aux Bahamas, à Curaçao et à Grenade, en particulier dans des applications telles que la gestion d’archives et d’enregistrements, l’éducation et les services de gestion des catastrophes naturelles.

Les conclusions de l’étude du PIPT ont tout d’abord été présentées à la Conférence caribéenne sur les données ouvertes et Code Sprint (Caribbean Open Data Conference and Code Sprint), qui s’est tenue en avril 2013 autour du thème du développement des Caraïbes. L’événement a été organisé simultanément dans 7 pays, ce qui a fourni de nombreuses opportunités d’échanges autour des conclusions de l’étude avec les acteurs locaux, et de partage des expériences, des leçons à tirer et des solutions aux éventuels problèmes. Les participants ont accueilli favorablement l’initiative du PIPT.

En juillet 2013, une quarantaine de décideurs politiques ont assisté à une réunion de consultation à Sainte-Lucie. Cette réunion a permis de valider les conclusions de l’étude et de soutenir la définition de feuilles de route au niveau de chaque pays.

Grâce au PIPT et autres programmes de l’UNESCO, ces plans, ainsi que les recommandations de l’étude vont être suivis durant deux ans, de 2014 à 2016. Les enseignements et les acquis de l’expérience caribéenne mis en lumière dans le rapport final ont retenu l’attention de pays et de partenaires en Afrique, en Asie et dans le Pacifique, ce qui a permis de soutenir des expériences pilotes dans ces régions et de leur fournir des informations.

Le programme intergouvernemental PIPT (Programme Information pour tous) a commencé en 2001. Il fournit une plate-forme pour des débats politiques internationaux, des coopérations et pour le développement de recommandations afin de mener à bien des actions dans les domaines de l’accès à l’information et à la connaissance. Le PIPT soutient les États membres dans la formulation et la mise en œuvre de leurs stratégies et cadres directeurs nationaux en matière d'information.

UNESCO organizes Information Ethics Panel at WSIS +10 High Level Forum

News - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:06

Information networks, the content they transmit, the actors they connect and the diversity of their uses creates a rich, dynamic global information ecosystem. This has created new modes of social existence as well as relations of power and influence that are shaping the contemporary social, economic, political and cultural reality. Accordingly, the C10 Action Line session explored opportunities and challenges as well as potential policy responses to these developments, using a format that combined expert panel presentations with interactive exchanges between panelists and the audience.

Three areas were identified where greater attention is needed if human rights and development goals are to be realized:

  • The philosophy, process and roles that support the design and use of information architectures,
  • Supporting multi-dimensional responses to the complexity of information ecosystems, and
  • Supporting greater engagement and involvement of all users through the provision of media and information literacy programmes that enhance their capacity to effectively use the virtual spaces.

Participants and experts highlighted the important role of multi-stakeholder approaches in the co-managing of information ecosystems, reducing undesirable effects and ensuring that the potential benefits of these development are realized and available to all persons. As Dr Rafael Capurro, of the Capurro Fieks Foundation explained, “we need to broaden the discourse, we need to have other viewpoints…and we must also think more about vulnerability and human dignity in the digital world”.

Cloud computing and big data were identified as additional drivers of societal transformation whose impacts were not yet fully understood, consequently there was a need for greater awareness of information ethics among users as well as information professionals about emerging technologies. Formal and non-formal educational programmes, public debates and town hall consultations were identified as effective public awareness raising strategies.

The meeting report will inform the preparation of activities organized at next year’s 2015 WSIS Forum and the post-2015 workplan for the Action Line. Hopefully these efforts will contribute to what Dr S. Romi Mukherjee of Sciences-Po, calls “a new enlightenment to accompany the digital revolution”.

In his concluding remarks, the session Chair Mr Paul Hector, Programme Specialist in UNESCO’s Knowledge Societies Division, thanked participants for the rich, vibrant and constructive exchange of viewpoints, which in his view “clearly demonstrated that information ethics was now intimately weaved into daily life… our challenge was through active, informed engagement of all stakeholders, based on human rights principles to collectively envision and shape the futures we desire”.

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L’UNESCO organise un atelier de formation et de consultation sur le développement des médias à Madagascar

Actualités - Fri, 13/06/2014 - 14:48

Ces deux évènements constituent le coup d’envoi de l’évaluation du paysage médiatique malgache qui sera réalisée, sous la supervision de l’UNESCO, par le Centre de Recherche en Communication (CERCOM) de l’Université d’Antananarivo, qui est un centre de référence de formation en journalisme en Afrique.  L’étude constituera une aide à la réflexion sur l’évolution des médias à Madagascar, dans un contexte de transition après d’importants changements politiques dans le pays depuis la fin 2013. Les résultats de l’évaluation et les recommandations qui en seront issues seront adoptées de manière participative au cours d’Etats Généraux des medias à Madagascar, qui seront placés sous le patronage des autorités nationales. Des études du même type ont été récemment finalisées en Egypte, en Tunisie et au Népal par l’initiative de l’UNESCO.

L’atelier de formation a réuni 20 chercheur-e-s et étudiant-e-s pour les familiariser sur une évaluation basée sur les IDM de l'UNESCO et assurer la qualité de la méthodologie de l’étude. La formation n’a pas seulement produit un plan d’action pour la recherche mais a aussi permis une meilleure connaissance des éléments essentiels à prendre en compte pour une évaluation IDM et une analyse en profondeur des cinq catégories d’IDM.  Dans l'évaluation finale de la formation, l'un des participants a souligné avoir apprécié "l'encouragement à l'interaction, le partage des documents de travail, le partage interpersonnel avec les autres participants et collègues (de l'UNESCO et du PNUD notamment) ainsi que l'encadrement solide". Un autre a indiqué avoir pu grâce à cet atelier "[s'] approprier les indicateurs, ce qui [lui] permettra, ainsi qu'à l'équipe, de mieux les conjuguer avec leur propre méthodologie."

La réunion de consultation a eu pour but une clarification du rôle du comité consultatif dans le processus de recherche et une présentation des IDM.  Le Comite consultatif a pour fonction de créer un pont entre le processus d'évaluation et les parties prenantes nationales, contribuant ainsi à garantir l'appropriation nationale du processus d'évaluation. Il est composé de représentants du PNUD, du Centre d’Information des Nations Unies (CINU), de la presse écrite, des médias audiovisuels, des institutions académiques et de la société civile.

UNESCO organizing a training workshop and consultation on media development in Madagascar

News - Fri, 13/06/2014 - 11:55

These two events are the starting point of a comprehensive evaluation of the media landscape in Madagascar.  The research will be conducted under the supervision of UNESCO by the Centre for Communication Research (CERCOM) of the University of Antananarivo, a potential centre of reference in journalism education in Africa. The study will inform an in-depth review of the media sector in Madagascar, in a context of transition after major political changes in the country since the end of 2013.  The results of the assessment and recommendations arising from this study will be adopted in a participatory manner during a General Assembly of the media in Madagascar which is planned for later this year under the auspices of the national authorities. Studies of the same type have recently been completed by UNESCO in Egypt, Tunisia and Nepal.

The workshop was attended by 20 student and researchers with the goal to familiarize them with the UNESCO methodology based on the Media Development Indicators and to empower them to do carry out a quality assessment.  The training has not only produced a research action plan but also allowed for a better understanding of the key elements to consider when using the Media Development Indicators. It also involved a detailed analysis of the five categories of MDIs.

During the final evaluation of the training, one participant noted how he appreciated "the encouragement to interact and share working documents among colleagues and representatives from UNESCO and UNDP, as well as the clear guidance provided".  Another participant who participated in the workshop indicated that he can now use the indicators, which will permit him and the team to better use the methodology.

The consultation meeting was designed to clarify the role of the Advisory Committee in the research process and also presented the media development indicators. The Advisory Committee will create a bridge between the assessment and national stakeholders and help to ensure national ownership of the evaluation process. The Advisory Committee is composed of representatives of UNDP, the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC), the print and broadcasting media, academic institutions and civil society.

Apprendre en Innovant

Actualités - Fri, 13/06/2014 - 11:48

Savoir coder est une émancipation. Il ne s’agit plus seulement de former des ingénieurs mais aussi bien de donner à tous les citoyens les moyens de créer, de travailler, de gérer un grand nombre d’informations, de porter un regard critique sur la technologie et de s’amuser. Dans cette optique, "savoir coder" c'est davantage une nouvelle façon d'apprendre plus que le seul enseignement de la technique du code.

Avec sa nouvelle initiative « YouthMobile », l'UNESCO veut que le plus grand nombre de jeunes filles et de garçons aient la possibilité, à travers le code, de mettre la technologie au service des problématiques locales ou globales liées au développement durable.

L’UNESCO et ses partenaires s’efforcent de fournir aux jeunes un niveau élevé de compétences et la confiance nécessaires au développement, à la promotion et à la vente d’applications mobiles.

De nombreux volontaires à travers le monde déploient déjà des formations mais ces programmes ne sont souvent pas faciles à répliquer, à traduire ou à adapter par des parents ou professeurs non techniciens.

Intel® Coding for Kids. un pack open source de cours et logiciels reprenant les meilleures méthodes internationales, peut répondre aux critères de l'initiative YouthMobile de l’UNESCO. Des partenaires pédagogiques et associatifs pourront librement adapter et construire leur propre programme, dans le cadre d'un déploiement international.

Dans ce type d'approche, le code est utilisé comme un moyen de création artistique, de compréhension de problèmes sociaux, scientifiques et environnementaux. Sur la forme, la pédagogie proposée est de type pair à pair. Côté technique, le code est introduit très progressivement et à chaque étape produit un savoir-faire utilisable tel quel.

En outre, la table ronde organisée par l'UNESCO et Intel Software mettra l'accent sur d'autres approches novatrices adoptées récemment en France, comme Simplon.co et l'Ecole42 et essayera d'évaluer la faisabilité d'un déploiement plus large et durable d'initiatives de ce type, notamment dans les pays émergents.

Le festival mondial Futur en Seine se déroulera du 12 au 22 juin 2014, au cœur de Paris et dans toute l’Île-de-France. Pour plus d'informations : http://www.futur-en-seine.fr/fens2014

Learn by Coding

News - Fri, 13/06/2014 - 11:40

Learning how to code is emancipation. It is no longer only about training engineers, but rather to give all citizens the means to create, work, manage a lot of information, take a critical look at technology and having fun in doing so. In this context, “coding” must be seen as a new way to learn more than the mere teaching the “coding techniques”.

With its new "YouthMobile" initiative, UNESCO wants the largest number of girls and boys have the opportunity, through the code, to put technology at the service of local and global issues related to sustainable development. UNESCO and its partners strive to provide young people with the high level skills and confidence necessary for the development, promotion and sale of mobile applications.

Many volunteers around the world are already deploying “coding” trainings but these programmes are often not easy to replicate, translate, or to be adapted by parents or teachers, not technicians.

Intel ® Coding for Kids. an open source package of trainings and software incorporating international best practices in this field, can meet the criteria of UNESCO's YouthMobile initiative. Educational and/or non-profit partner associations can freely adapt and build their own programmes, within the framework of an international deployment.

In this approach, the code is used as a means of artistic creation, understanding of social, scientific and environmental problems. The proposed pedagogy model is based on peer-to-peer. Technically, the code is introduced very gradually and at each step the learner acquires ready-to-use expertise.

In addition, the round table organized by UNESCO and Intel Software will focus on other innovative approaches recently adopted in France, such as Simplon.co and Ecole42 and will try to assess the feasibility of larger deployments and sustainability of similar initiatives, particularly in emerging countries.

The Futur en Seine festival will take place from 12 to 22 June 2014, in the heart of Paris and across the Île-de-France. For more information: http://www.futur-en-seine.fr/fens2014

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